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Apricot Vanilla Bean Jam

Apricot Vanilla Bean Jam

2 pounds ripe apricots
1/4 C. water
Small wedge fresh lemon
2 1/2 C. granulated sugar
1 to 2 vanilla beans

Cut the apricots in half and remove the pits. Place apricot halves, water, the juice from the lemon, and the lemon rind itself in a large non-reactive pot. Stirring intermittently, cook over medium-high heat until the juices begin to boil. Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer until the apricots are soft and tender, 5 to 10 minutes. Once soft and tender, stir in the sugar. Split the vanilla beans down their length, scrape out the seeds, then add both the seeds and the pods to the pot. Increase the heat back up to high and bring to a rolling boil. Clip on a candy thermometer and continue to cook, while stirring, until the jam thickens and reaches about 220°F. Carefully remove the vanilla bean pods and lemon rind. Ladle the jam into clean 4-oz., half-pint, or pint-sized glass jars and store in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.

Recipe Notes: Taste your fruit first to check for ripeness and sweetness. Additional sugar may be required. This recipes keeps the skin on the apricot before cooking. You can remove the skins before cooking if you like. To check for doneness, place a small plate in the freezer when you start the recipe. As the jam nears completion, place a small amount on the plate and return the freezer. If the jam wrinkles as you nudge it, it is done.

Classic Peach Jam

Classic Peach Jam

3 pounds peaches, peeled, pitted and finely chopped
5 1/2 C. sugar
2 T. fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp. butter
1 box fruit pectin (I use Sure-Jell)

Place the peaches and lemon juice into a large pot. At this point, I like to take my potato masher and mash the peaches a bit. Measure the sugar into a separate bowl and set aside. Stir the package of pectin into the peaches and add the butter. Stirring frequently, bring the peach mixture to a full rolling boil (a boil that does not stop bubbling when stirred), then add the sugar. Stir to fully incorporate.
Return the mixture to a full, rolling boil and boil for exactly 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove the pot from the heat. Skim any foam from the surface. Ladle quickly into clean jars. (I like to use a wide funnel.) Wipe the rims of the jars with a clean cloth. Place the heated lids (lids that have been placed in simmering water for at least a minute) on the jars and tighten the bands. Place the jars in a canner and process (gently boil) for 10 minutes (water should cover the jars by an inch or two–add boiling water, if necessary), then remove the jars from the canner. Cool completely before storing. Make certain all lids have sealed properly before storing. If the lid springs back when pressed in the middle, it is not sealed and should be stored in the refrigerator.

Mango, Vanilla, Lime and Cardamom Jam

Mango, Vanilla, Lime and Cardamom Jam

10 C. mango, pureed in the food processor, but with some chunks still remaining (about 10 mangos)
8 C. granulated sugar
1/4 C. lime juice
3 vanilla beans, split and scraped out (alternately, you can add 2T.of vanilla AFTER cooking the jam, just before putting into containers)
1/2 tsp. ground cardamom

In a large dutch oven or pot, combine the pureed mango, sugar, lime juice, seeds scraped from the vanilla beans as well as the split vanilla beans (which will be discarded later), and ground cardamom. Slowly bring the mixture up to a boil over medium/high, stirring occasionally to prevent the jam from burning. Once the jam is at a rolling boil, turn the heat down to medium, and continue to boil for 25-30 minutes, stirring occasionally. You can test to see if you have cooked your jam long enough by putting some on a plate or small bowl and putting it in the freezer for a few minutes. Once it has cooled, it should be a nice jam consistency, not too runny. If it is still too runny, continue cooking and checking, until you have reached your desired consistency. Remove and discard the scraped out vanilla bean pods and pour jam into clean jars or containers, allowing to cool to room temperature before storing in the refrigerator or freezer.

Spiced Rhubarb-Cherry Chutney

Spiced Rhubarb-Cherry Chutney

Most home cooks consider rhubarb a fruit, which is why it has earned the nickname “the pie plant.” But rhubarb is actually a vegetable and thus perfectly suited for savory uses as well as desserts. When I spot the first crimson stalks at the farmers’ market, I shuttle them home to make this gently spiced rhubarb-cherry chutney. Try it spooned atop slices of roasted pork tenderloin.

¾ C. packed dark brown sugar
1⁄3 C. red wine vinegar
1 ½ lb. rhubarb, cut into ½-inch pieces (4 C.)
½ C. dried cherries
Zest of 1 orange
½ tsp. ground cinnamon
½ tsp. ground cloves
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Bring the sugar and vinegar to a boil over medium-high heat in a large saucepan. Stir in the rhubarb, cherries, orange zest, cinnamon, cloves, and black pepper with a wooden spoon, and bring the mixture back to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the rhubarb is tender and the mixture thickens slightly, about 6 minutes. Let the chutney cool to room temperature before transferring it to an airtight container. Stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator, it will keep for about 1 week. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Strawberry Balsamic Refrigerator Jam

Strawberry Balsamic Refrigerator Jam

1 tsp. lemon juice
zest of 1 lemon
1 lb. strawberries, stems removed and roughly chopped (good use for overripe berries)
1/3 C. sugar to 1/2 C., depends on sweetness of your strawberries
1 tsp. aged balsamic vinegar

Combine the lemon juice, lemon zest, strawberries, and sugar in a saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium high heat and cook for 10 minutes, stirring frequently. It will look really watery at first, but it will start to thicken up as it reduces. Once you have the thickness you want, reduce the heat to medium and add the balsamic vinegar. Cook for 3 more minutes, then place your jam in a clean glass container. Refrigerate, and spread on biscuits, toast, or whatever you’d like. Enjoy!

Mango Lime Jam

Mango Lime Jam

3 C. mango pulp, coarsely chopped into raisin-sized pieces
3¼ C. granulated sugar
¼ C. fresh lime juice
Zest of 2 limes
Half of 3-oz. pouch of liquid pectin

In a nonreactive pan, mix together mango, sugar, and lime juice, and bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. When the mixture comes to a boil, add the lime zest, turn up the heat to medium and let the mango mixture boil for 3 minutes, stirring constantly. Stir in the liquid pectin and let the mixture boil for one more minute. Take the pot off the heat and let the jam rest for 5 minutes before putting it into the jars. This allows the jam to thicken up a bit which promotes better suspension of mango pulp; otherwise the mango pieces will rise to the top instead of being interspersed throughout the entire jar. Process with the water bath canning method. Alternatively, the jam can be stored in airtight containers and kept refrigerated.

Strawberry Vanilla Jam

Strawberry Vanilla Jam

This recipe is a classic Strawberry Jam. But we’ve brought it to modern taste standards by using Pomona’s Pectin which requires little or no sweetener. Pomona’s Pectin relies on Calcium Water (included in the box of pectin) to make the jam set. It can be found in stores like Whole Foods that sell natural or organic products. When using any pectin product, always follow the package directions exactly. Otherwise your set may be comprised.

Makes about 6 -7 half-pints

½ to 1 ½ C. honey or other sweetener (sugar, agave nectar, maple, etc.) (Sweetener can be added to taste)
4 tsp. Pomona’s Pectin powder
3 pounds rinsed and hulled strawberries, crushed, about 8 C. (you could dice or puree, but this could affect the consistency of the final product)
3 tsp. fresh lemon juice, strained
3 tsp. vanilla extract
4 tsp. calcium powder liquid (made up by following directions in box of pectin)

Prepare canning pot with jars (no lids or bands) by covering jars with water and bringing to a boil. When boiling, turn heat down to medium and hold until ready to use. Stir sugar and pectin power together. Put strawberries, lemon juice, vanilla and calcium solution in a wide 6-8 quart stockpot or deep stainless steel skillet. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring in the sugar-pectin mixture. Stir until sugar is dissolved, about 1-2 minutes. Return to a boil, then remove from heat. Ladle into hot jars, leaving ¼ inch headspace at the top. Wipe rims of the jars with a damp cloth, bubble with a table knife or jar bubbler, place lid and band on each jar. Return jars to boiling water canning pot, with water covering jars by 1 inch. Bring water back to a boil and boil for 5 minutes to process. Remove jars to a folded towel on heatproof surface. Do not disturb for 12 hours. Remove bands and test lids for seal. If any jar hasn’t sealed, immediately refrigerate. Label and date jars and store.

Small Batch Strawberry Vanilla Jam

Small Batch Strawberry Vanilla Jam

1 quart strawberries (a little over 1 1/2 pounds, should be approximately 4 C. chopped berries)
2 C. sugar, divided
2 vanilla beans, split and scraped
1 lemon, zested and juiced

Wash and chop berries. Toss them with 1 C. sugar and the vanilla beans/seeds and place in a large jar or bowl. Allow the berries to macerate for at least 2-3 hours and up to 72 hours. When you’re ready to make the jam, prepare three half pint jars. Pour macerated strawberries into a large pot and add the remaining C. sugar. Bring to a boil and cook until the jam reaches 220 degrees, stirring very regularly.
6.Add the lemon zest and juice in the final 5 minutes of cooking. Once the jam has reached 220 degrees, remove the pan from the heat. Pour jam into your prepared jars. Wipe rims, apply lids and rings and process in your canner for 10 minutes (normally I’d admonish you not to start your timer until the water has returned to a boil. However, as long as your water is quite hot when the jars go into the canner, the time it will take to return to boiling should be minimal). When time is up, remove jars from canner and let them cool on a towel-lined counter top. When jars are cool enough to handle, remove rings and check seals. If any jars are not sealed, store them in the fridge and use them first. Store sealed jars in a cool, dark place.

Nectarine and Peach Jam with Lemon Verbena

Nectarine and Peach Jam with Lemon Verbena

This is refrigerator jam, allowing you to skip the fuss and time of canning.

1 lemon
3 pounds ripe nectarines or peaches, or a mix, pitted and sliced
730 grams sugar (3 and 1/4 C.)
Pinch salt
10 sprigs fresh lemon verbena

Grate zest from half the lemon and place zest in a large saucepan. Juice lemon and add the juice to the zest. Toss in fruit, sugar, salt and lemon verbena and bring to a simmer. Turn mixture into a large bowl and refrigerate overnight. The next day, if you plan to can the jam, prepare the jars according to the instructions here. Strain the liquid from the mixture into a wide, shallow pot or large skillet, reserving the fruit. Bring liquid to a simmer and cook until it thickens enough to wrinkle on the surface when you push it with a spoon (a candy thermometer should read 220 degrees). Remove lemon verbena from fruit and add fruit to the pot with the syrup. Simmer fruit gently until mixture looks very thick and jamlike. You can test the jam to see if it’s ready by freezing a small plate. Drop a bit of the jam on the plate, let it cool for a minute and then push it with your finger. The top should wrinkle. If syrup is thin and runny, keep cooking and test again in a few minutes (return plate to freezer in the meantime). If canning, spoon into hot sterilized jars and process as directed. Otherwise, let jam cool, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

Cherry Preserves

Cherry Preserves

2 lbs cherries, pitted (6 C.)
1 (3 1/2 ounce) box pectin
1⁄4 C. granulated sugar
1⁄2 tsp. butter
3 C. sugar

Sterilize your jars and keep them hot while you’re cooking the preserves. Place cherries in a large, heavy duty dutch oven. Combine pectin with 1/4 C. sugar; stir into cherries, Add butter. Bring to a full boil, stirring, over high heat. Add 3 more C. sugar and return to a boil , stirring constantly, boil 1 minutes. Remove from heat; skim off foam. Immediately spoon preserves into 3 one pint sterilized jars, leaving 1/4″ headspace. Wipe the sealing surface of the jars with a clean paper towel, dampened with hot water, to remove any preserves or sugar crystals. Place lids and screw on bands fingertip tight. Process in a boiling water bath for at least ten minutes, depending upon your altitude. When the jars have been processed in boiling water for the recommended time, turn off the heat and remove the canner lid; wait 5 minutes. Remove jars from canner using a jar lifter and keeping jars upright. Carefully place them directly onto a towel or cake cooling rack to protect your countertop, leaving at least one inch of space between the jars during cooling. Avoid placing the jars on a cold surface or in a cold draft. After jars have cooled undisturbed for 24 hours, remove ring bands from sealed jars. Put any unsealed jars in the refrigerator and use first.

Mango Preserves with Ginger and Lime

Mango Preserves with Ginger and Lime

6 ataulfo mangos, medium ripe (these are sometimes called “Champagne mangoes”)
2 C. sugar (or enough to equal half the measure of diced fruit)
1½ T. minced fresh ginger
1 juicy lime

Peel the mango and cut it into ½-inch dice. The easiest way to do this is to cut the flesh in a grid pattern while it is attached to the large pit, and then scrape the diced pieces from the pit into a bowl. Measure the mango and place it in a large saucepan along with sugar about half the measure of the fruit (I had 4 C. mango and used 2 C. sugar). Add the ginger. Juice the lime and add the juice to the mango. Cut the shell of the lime into quarters and set aside. If there are seeds, place them in a small cheesecloth bag and set aside. You will later add them to the mango mixture to help develop pectin.

Bring the mango and sugar mixture to a simmer over medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Pour it into a bowl and add the lime peel and seeds, if any. When the mixture is cool, crumple a piece of parchment paper, set it on top and refrigerate the mixture overnight. (If you have aromatic items in the refrigerator, cover the bowl loosely with plastic wrap. Prepare jars for water bath canning. Place a saucer in the freezer. Remove the lime shells and pour the mango mixture into a large, wide, heavy-bottomed saucepan. Bring it just to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring so that the mixture doesn’t stick to the bottom. Reduce the heat to allow the mixture to simmer just below the boiling point for about 25 minutes or until thick. Stir from time to time to prevent the mixture from scorching. Test for gel by placing a couple of drops on the frozen saucer and pushing it with your finger. If the jam wrinkles, the gel will be fine. You can also tell the jam is done by pulling a spoon across the bottom of the pan. If it leaves a clean line, the mixture is well gelled. Process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes after the water comes to a boil. Turn off the heat, remove the canner lid and let the jars sit for 5 minutes before removing them to a counter to sit undisturbed until sealed.

Spicy Tomato Jam

Spicy Tomato Jam

10 lb. tomatoes, cored and finely chopped
5 C. sugar
1 C. fresh squeezed lime juice
1 T. ground ginger
2 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. cloves
2 T. sea salt
2 T. red pepper flakes

Combine all, bring to a boil. Simmer and let reduce by at least half, stirring regularly to prevent the pot from scalding. Puree the mixture a little with an immersion blender; you still want it to be a bit chunky. Continue simmering until it reduces by half again and becomes a sticky jammy mess. When jam has cooked down sufficiently, remove pot from heat and ladle into hot, sterile half-pint jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe rims, apply lids and bands and process in a boiling water bath for 25 minutes.

Italian Plum Jam with Star Anise

Italian Plum Jam with Star Anise

2 1/2 C. chopped Italian plums
2/3 C. granulated sugar
3 star anise blossoms

Combine chopped plums, sugar and star anise blossoms. Let sit for at least an hour, or until the fruit has gotten quite syrup-y. Put fruit in a medium-sized pan and place over high heat. Bring to a boil and cook for 10 to 15 minutes, until the jam thickens and passes the plate test. Because this jam has such a small yield, you can skip the canning step and just pour it into the jars and pop it into the fridge. Or, you can pull out your small batch canning set-up and put up either one pint or two half pints (all the better to share with your friends!).

Quince Jelly

Quince Jelly

7 quinces
12 C. water

5 C. quince juice
3 3/4 C. sugar
5 tsp. lemon juice

To make the quince juice, core the quince and chop it into rough cubes. Combine quince pieces and water in a large pot and boil until the fruit and liquid turn a rosy color. This can take several hours, so do it when you have the time to wander in and out of the kitchen, keeping an eye on the pot. When it’s done, strain the juice from the pulp (don’t throw the pulp away!). At this point, you can either make the jelly or put the juice in the fridge for a day or two, until you have the time to cook it down. To make the jelly, combine the quince juice, sugar and lemon juice in a large pot (use something far larger than you think is necessary, this jelly bubbles a great deal). Bring to a boil and let it cook until it reaches 220 degrees. When it has reached the appropriate temperature, remove the pot from the heat. Fill jars, wipe rims, apply lids and screw on bands. Process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes. Let cool undisturbed for at least 12 hours. In the morning, check both the seals and the quality of the set. Because quince has so much innate pectin, it should be quite firm. Eat with cheese or smeared on a slice of cold turkey.

Apricot Vanilla Bean Preserves with Rosé

Apricot Vanilla Bean Preserves with Rosé

6 C. pitted chopped ripe apricots
3 C. granulated sugar
½ C. Rosé wine
4 tsp. lemon juice
1 tsp. vanilla bean paste
1 tsp. unsalted butter

Preserving apricots with vanilla and wine plays up the flavor of apricots beautifully without overpowering the fruit. Place a couple small plates in the freezer, these will be used to test the preserves later. In an 8-quart heavy bottomed stainless steel pot, add all the preserve ingredients. Place pot on the stove over medium-high heat and cook, stirring regularly, until the mixture comes to a boil. Skim off the pale yellow foam that forms at the top and discard. Stir the preserves frequently to prevent it from sticking to the bottom. After about 25 minutes, begin testing the preserves by placing a small amount on a cold plate. Transfer the plate to the freezer for several minutes. If the cooled preserve is the desired consistency, then it is ready for final processing. If not, cook a few more minutes and check again. To process jars: Ladle boiling water from the canning pot into the bowl with the lids. Using a jar lifter, remove the sterilized jars from the canning pot, carefully pouring the water from each one back into the pot, and place them upright on a folded towel. Drain the water off the jar lids. Ladle the hot preserves into the jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace at the top. Use a damp paper towel to wipe the rims of the jars and place flat lid and band on each jar. Tighten bands just finger-tight. Return the jars to the water in the canning pot, making sure the water covers the jars by at least 1 inch. Bring to a boil, and boil for 8 minutes to process. Transfer the jars to a folded towel and do not disturb for 12 hours. After 2 hours, check that the lids have sealed by pressing down on the center; if the lid gives and makes a clicking sound when pressed, it hasn’t sealed, and the jar should be refrigerated immediately. Sealed jars can be labeled and stored in a dark and cool place.

Tiny Batch Gooseberry Jam

Tiny Batch Gooseberry Jam

8 oz. gooseberries, topped and tailed
8 oz. granulated sugar
1/3 C. water
juice from 1/2 a lemon

Prepare a boiling water bath canner and a 12 oz. jam jar. Combine the prepped gooseberries, sugar, water, and lemon juice in a small saucepan. Set the pan on the stove over medium-high heat and begin to cook. If all the liquid evaporates before the gooseberries pop, add a splash more water. Cook for 10-12 minutes, until the gooseberries have popped and the mess has thickened. Taste the jam and add more lemon juice, if necessary for flavor balance. Remove the pan from the stove and funnel the jam into the prepared jar. Wipe the rims, apply the lid and ring, and process in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes.

Sweet Cherry Preserves

Sweet Cherry Preserves

This recipe doesn’t have any extra added pectin – it only uses natural pectin from the fruits. If you want your jam to be thicker, think about adding some extra pectin to the recipe, but it wasn’t necessary for my tastes. Also, in one of the batches of preserves I made, I added a bit of amaretto and I loved the way it heightened the cherry flavor.

4 C. washed, pitted cherries
Juice of 1 large lemon or 2 small lemons
1/2 C. white sugar
1/2 C. brown sugar
1-2 tsp. amaretto (optional)

Prepare cherries, then chop about 1/2 or 1/3 of them into rough pieces, and leave the others whole. Add all the cherries to a medium pot along with the lemon juice. Cook over medium heat, until they start bubbling, then continue to cook while stirring occasionally for about 20-25 minutes. Make sure you stir especially towards the end of that time so the juice on the bottom does not burn. As they are cooking, use a spoon to smash the whole cherries to release the juice and flatten them. (If you don’t flatten them, they will stay really round and the preserves will not be very ‘spreadable.’)

After the cherries are fully cooked, add the sugar, stir to mix it in and dissolve it, then continue to cook over medium-high heat for another 5-7 minutes. (Again, be sure to stir, so the sugar and cherries don’t burn.) After cooking, the juice should have started to ‘gel’ a bit and thicken so that it starts to coat the back of your spoon or ladle. Remove the preserves from heat, and test if they are done. If the preserves are not done, return them to the heat and cook them for a few more minutes, then test them again. When done, let the preserves cool slightly*, then transfer it to jars. Once they are cooled, they will keep refrigerated for several months.

Blueberry and Apple Jam

Blueberry and Apple Jam

1 pound Granny Smith apples (about 3 small)
2 pounds blueberries, rinsed
1 1/2 C. sugar
3 T. fresh lemon juice
Grated zest of 1 lemon

Prepare for water-bath canning: Sterilize the jars and keep them hot in the canning pot, put a small plate in the freezer, and put the flat lids in a heatproof bowl. (See this page for details.) Peel, core, and dice the apples, reserving the peels, cores, and seeds. Put as many of the apple trimmings in a jelly bag or 4 layers of cheesecloth as will fit, and tie the bag closed. Put the blueberries and sugar in a wide, 6- to 8-quart preserving pan. Bring to a simmer, stirring frequently, then continue to cook until the juices are just deep enough to cover the blueberries, about 5 minutes. Pour into a colander set over a large bowl and stir the berries gently to drain off the juice. Return the juice to the pan, along with the apples and the bag with the trimmings, and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil, stirring occasionally, until the syrup is reduced and thick and registers about 220°F on a candy thermometer, 15 to 20 minutes. Return the blueberries and any accumulated juice, along with the lemon juice and zest, to the pan and bring to a simmer. Simmer, stirring frequently, until a small dab of the jam spooned onto the chilled plate and returned to the freezer for a minute wrinkles when you nudge it, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir gently for a few seconds to distribute the fruit in the liquid. Ladle boiling water from the canning pot into the bowl with the lids. Using a jar lifter, remove the sterilized jars from the canning pot, carefully pouring the water from each one back into the pot, and place them upright on a folded towel. Drain the water off the jar lids. Ladle the hot jam into the jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace at the top. Use a damp paper towel to wipe the rims of the jars, then put a flat lid and ring on each jar, adjusting the ring so that it’s just finger-tight. Return the jars to the water in the canning pot, making sure the water covers the jars by at least 1 inch. Bring to a boil, and boil for 5 minutes to process. Remove the jars to a folded towel and do not disturb for 12 hours. After 1 hour, check that the lids have sealed by pressing down on the center of each; if it can be pushed down, it hasn’t sealed, and the jar should be refrigerated immediately. Label the sealed jars and store.

Mixed Pepper-Pear Chutney

Mixed Pepper-Pear Chutney

2 pears, chopped
2 large tomatoes, chopped
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
1 lb. mixed chili peppers, chopped – I used a number of sweets and some spicy ajis from our garden
1 C. apple cider vinegar
1 C. brown sugar
3 tsp. ginger powder
1 tsp. ground mustard
Salt and pepper to taste
2 T. olive oil

Heat a large pot to medium heat and add the olive oil with all of the fruit and vegetables. Cook them for about 10 minutes, stirring often, to cook them down. Add remaining ingredients and bring to a bowl. Reduce heat to low and cook about an hour to thicken the chutney. At this point you can process the chutney to smooth it out or keep it as-is – nice and chunky. Alternatively, instead of keeping everything in the pot, you can transfer your mixture to a slow cooker after cooking it all down a bit in the pot and let it cook low and slow, on the low setting, about 3 hours. It will turn into an excellent chutney!

Rhubarb Orange Vanilla Jam

Rhubarb Orange Vanilla Jam

6 C. granulated sugar
2 large navel oranges
5 C. finely chopped rhubarb
1 vanilla bean
One (1.75-oz.) package regular powdered pectin
1/2 tsp. unsalted butter

If you are going to preserve the jam, prepare the jars and lids: place 6 half-pint jars on a rack in a large pot. Add enough water to cover the jars, and bring to boil over high heat. Boil for 10 minutes, then turn off the heat and allow the jars to rest in the hot water. Meanwhile, put the bands and lids in a small saucepan and cover with water. Heat over medium heat until the water is simmering, then remove pan from the heat and allow the bands and lids to rest in the hot water until ready to use.

Measure the sugar into a large bowl and set aside. Wash one of the oranges and remove the rind in quarters. Thinly slice the rinds lengthwise, cutting away any excess pith. Chop the strips of rind crosswise into small pieces. Squeeze juice from both oranges. You should have about 1 C.. If you don’t, make up the difference with water.

Combine the orange rinds, orange juice, and rhubarb in a large, heavy-bottomed pot. Split the vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape the seeds into the pot. Add the vanilla bean to the pot. Sprinkle the pectin evenly over the fruit and bring to a full boil over medium-high heat, stirring frequently.

Add the sugar to the pot all at once, stirring until dissolved. Add the butter and continue to cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture comes to a full rolling boil. Boil hard for one minute. Remove the pot from the stove and skim any foam from the surface of the jam.

Ladle the hot jam into the hot sterilized jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, cover with the lids, and screw the bands on until just barely tight. Place the jars on a rack in pot and cover completely with water. Cover the pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil for 10 minutes. Turn off heat, uncover the pot, and allow the jars to rest for five minutes. Remove the jars and allow them to rest undisturbed on the countertop for six hours or overnight.

Mango Lime Basil Jam

Mango Lime Basil Jam

8 pounds mangoes, very ripe -peeled, cored and mashed
4 C. sugar
10-12 basil leaves, whole
1 package Sure-Jell
1/4 C. lime concentrate or fresh lime juice
1/2 tsp. ground ginger, optional

Peel and core mangoes. The mangoes I used were very very ripe so I just squeezed them from the pit/core making sure they were mashed well. In a heavy sauce pan, boil mango puree with remaining ingredients for about 25-30 minutes until mixture begins to thicken. Adjust lime and sugar content as needed for your own taste. *I love mine full of lime, so I tend to lime it up! Pour into nine prepared half-pint jars and seal. *This jam comes out as a softer spread, but is yummy just the same! Has the sweetness of ripe mango but the lime and basil gives it the savory that balances the sweetness!

Oregon Cottage’s Tomato Chutney

Oregon Cottage’s Tomato Chutney

4 lb. tomatoes, peeled, cored and chopped
1/4 C. minced garlic (about a medium sized head)
1 C. chopped onions
3/4 C. brown sugar
3/4 C. white sugar
1-1/2 C. cider vinegar
1 T. pickling salt
1 lime, zested and juiced
1 T. dry, ground ginger
1 tsp. hot pepper flakes (or to taste)
1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1/2 C. raisins, chopped

Combine all the ingredients in a heavy nonreactive 4-6 quart pot. Bring to a boil over high heat, then lower heat and cook at a low simmer for 1-1/2 to 2 hours until thickened. Stir often as it thickens to prevent scorching. Ladle the chutney into 1/2 pint canning jars leaving 1/4″ headspace and attach the two-piece canning lids. Boil in a boiling-water canner for 10 minutes. Remove and cool before storing in a dark, cool place. Makes five 1/2 pint jars

Strawberry, Balsamic and Black Pepper Jam

Strawberry, Balsamic and Black Pepper Jam

3 pounds fresh strawberries, hulled and chopped (about 9 C.)
1 1/2 C. white granulated sugar
1/4 C. balsamic vinegar
1 tsp. finely ground black pepper (or to taste)

Start by getting a very large pot of water on the stove for processing the jars. It needs to be large enough so that there will be at least 1-inch of water above your jars – I use a very large soup pot. That much water takes a long time to boil, so put it on first. At the same time, place a small clean saucer in the freezer. If you time this whole process well, the jars should be done just a few minutes before your jam.

When the water starts boiling, add your empty jars to the water to sterilize. If you don’t have a canning rack, place a cotton tea towel in the bottom of the pot. Make sure your jars don’t touch the bottom or sides of the pot. Place the lids and rings in a heat proof bowl, ladle in some of the boiling water to cover, and leave to sit. Boil the jars for at least 10 minutes, and then carefully remove, dumping out the water from each one before placing on a dish towel. Keep the water boiling in the pot for processing.

In a large pot or dutch oven over medium heat, stir the sugar in with the strawberries and bring to a simmer. Cook for 5 minutes, then strain the fruit through a fine colander, stirring the fruit a bit to loosen the juices. Return the juice to the pot and reserve the fruit.

Simmer the juice uncovered for 20 minutes, or until you have about 1 1/2 C. remaining. Return the strawberries to the the pot with the juices, and add the balsamic vinegar. Continue cooking for another 15 minutes. To check if the jam is done, remove the saucer from the freezer, place a dab of the liquid jam on the plate, and return the plate to the freezer for 1 minute. The jam will be stiff, but won’t quite gel.

Remove from the heat, and skim off as much of the foam as you can. Stir in the black pepper to your taste. It’s difficult to get a sense of the amount of pepper when the jam is hot, so if you want to check the flavor put a big glob of jam on the plate in the freezer for a minute. When it’s cool give it a taste, and add more pepper until you’re happy with the result.

At this point your jars should be ready to go. Fill each jar to within a 1/4 inch of the top (I know, that’s really full!). Put on the lids and tighten the rings to just finger tight – you want the air to be able to escape during processing. If you don’t have quite enough jam left to completely fill the last jar, place it in the fridge and eat within a few weeks.

Carefully lower your jars into the boiling water, again using a rack or a towel, and keeping the jars from touching the bottom or sides of the pot, or from touching each other. That last thing you want after all this work is for a jar to crack or explode! Process for 5 minutes – if you live above 1000 ft, add 1 extra minute for each additional 1000 ft above sea level.

Remove the jars from the water and place on a towel in a corner of the kitchen where they can be left undisturbed for 12 hours. After about an hour, check that the tops of the lids are fully sealed by pressing down on the middle of the lid – if you find one that pops up and down, place that jar in the fridge immediately and eat within a few weeks.

Cranberry, Orange & Hazelnut Conserve

Cranberry, Orange & Hazelnut Conserve

1 quart unfiltered cranberry juice
1/4 cup apple cider
1 cup sugar
1 orange, peel cut in large strips
1 T. grated ginger
2 bay leaves
1 cup toasted hazelnuts
1 T. balsamic vinegar
1 pound fresh cranberries

In a medium saucepan, combine cranberry juice, apple cider, sugar, orange peel, ginger, and bay leaves. Simmer until the mixture is reduced by half, about 20 minutes. Add the nuts, vinegar, and cranberries. Continue to cook until the cranberries burst, about 15 minutes.

Roasted Tomato Jam

Roasted Tomato Jam

2 cups sugar
3 pounds ripe beefsteak tomatoes, cored and thinly sliced (1/4 inch)
Large pinch salt
Grated zest of 1 lemon
Juice of 1 lemon
1 cinnamon stick
1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds, lightly crushed
2 dried red chiles

Pour 1/3 of the sugar over the base of a 12-inch braising pan or other baking dish. Layer half the tomatoes, overlapping the slices, in the pan. Sprinkle with 1/3 cup sugar, and top with the lemon zest, lemon juice, cinnamon stick, fennel seeds, and chiles. Top with the remaining tomatoes, followed by the rest of the sugar. Let sit for 30 minutes. Heat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place the pan, uncovered in the oven and let cook for 1 hour. The tomato juices should simmer actively. Check every 20 minutes, spooning the juices over the top tomatoes, and removing the chiles if they char. Continue roasting and checking every 20 minutes — the tomato juices should begin to gel at 2 hours, but it could happen a little sooner or later. Test the juices by spooning a little onto a plate, letting it cool, and running your finger though it. If it holds the line, the jam is ready. Remove the jam from the oven and let cool. I eat this jam fresh so I put it into jars and keep it in the fridge.

Rangpur Lime Marmalade

Rangpur Lime Marmalade

1 1/2 pounds (about 5 large) Rangpur limes
4 1/2 cups water
3 1/2 cups sugar

Slice off the ends of one Rangpur lime and place it on one of its flat ends. Using a sharp knife or vegetable peeler, remove the peel in strips about 1-inch wide. Leave behind as much white pith as possible. Repeat with the remaining fruit. Use a sharp knife to help peel off any extra pith or remaining patches of skin [from the flesh of the fruit]. It doesn’t need to be perfect. Reserve the flesh of the fruit. Julienne the Rangpur lime peel by stacking 3 or 4 pieces on top of one another and slicing them thin. Place the julienned peel in your preserving pot and set aside. Now, slice the reserved fruit in half lengthwise and slice the half lengthwise again. Cut each quarter crosswise to form many small 1/8-inch-thick Rangpur lime triangles. Reserve the seeds as you go. Put the fruit slices in a medium-size nonreactive bowl as you work. Once the flesh is sliced, tie up the seeds in a square of cheesecloth or scrap of white tea towel. Add them to the preserving pot with the julienned peel and cover with the water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and pour in the sliced Rangpur lime fruit. Let cool to room temperature and refrigerate overnight.

[Before you start, remove the rangpur lime seed bundle from the preserving pot and give it a good squeeze into the mixture, then discard the seeds.] Add the sugar and, over high heat, bring to a boil that cannot be stirred down. Cook, stirring frequently, until it passes the plate test, about 18 minutes. Ladle into prepared half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Wipe rims. Place the lids on the jars and screw on the bands until they are fingertip tight. Process in a water-bath canner for 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude as needed. After 24 hours, check the seals. Label, date, and store out of direct sunlight without the bands for up to a year.

Zucchini Butter

Zucchini Butter

2 pounds zucchini or assorted summer squash (feel free to use less or add extra — cooking times will vary)
1/4 cup olive oil or butter
2 minced shallots, garlic, or combination of both
Salt and pepper

Coarsely grate the zucchini. Let it drain in a colander for 3 to 4 minutes or until you are ready to begin cooking. To hasten cooking time, squeeze the water out of the zucchini by wringing it in a clean cloth towel. In a deep skillet, heat the olive oil/butter. Sauté the shallots or garlic briefly. Add the zucchini and toss. Cook and stir over medium to medium-high heat until the zucchini reaches a spreadable consistency, about 15 minutes. If you scorch the bottom, turn the flame down! (And scrape those delicious bits into the butter for added flavor — you can splash in a little water to help deglaze the pan.) The zucchini will hold its bright green color and slowly caramelize into a nice vegetable jam. How to use it? Spread it on toast in place of actual butter. Cake a thick layer in a sandwich with salted tomatoes or soft cheese. Sauce a grilled pizza. Consider it a side dish. Or just eat a big heap of it, right out of the pan!

Grapefruit-Rhubarb Preserves

Grapefruit-Rhubarb Preserves

2 lb. (2 medium) Red Grapefruit
1 lb. (4 C.) Rhubarb, sliced 1/2 “ thick
2 C. Sugar

Cut 1-inch-thick strips of peel from the grapefruit, leaving as much pith behind as possible. Stack 3 or 4 pieces of peel together and julienne until youhHave 1/4 cup of julienned peel. Add to the preserving pot. Once you have enough peel, supreme the grapefruit, reserving the seeds and as much juice as possible. I find the easiest way to catch as much juice as possible is to work over a bowl or Pyrex measuring cup. Squeeze the “rag” of the grapefruit, the membrane that remains after you have cut away all the fruit during supreming. to extract as much juice as possible. Measure 1 1/2 cups supremed grapefruit sections and juice. Tie the seeds up in a square of cheesecloth or scrap of white tea towel. Add them to the preserving pot with the julienned peel, grapefruit flesh and juice, rhubarb chunks, and sugar. Over high heat, bring the mixture to a boil that cannot be stirred down. Immediately remove from heat, let cool, and refrigerate overnight. Remove and squeeze the grapefruit seed packet into the
preserving pot. Over high heat, bring to a boil that cannot be stirred down. Reduce to medium-high and cook, stirring frequently, until it passes the plate test. This small batch sets up quickly, in less than 10 minutes. Ladle into prepared half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-inch
headspace. Remove air bubbles and wipe rims. Place the lids on the jars and screw on the bands until they are fingertip tight. Process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude as needed. After 24 hours, check the seals. Label, date, and store out of direct sunlight without bands for up to a year.

Honey Lemon Pear Butter

Honey Lemon Pear Butter

2 lb. Bartlett Pears (5-6)
1/3 C. Honey
1 tsp. Cinnamon
Zest and Juice of 1 Lemon

Prepare a boiling water bath and 2 half-pint/250 ml jars. Place 2 lids in a small saucepan of water and bring to a gentle simmer. Wash, core, and quarter the pears. Place the pears in a medium saucepan with 2 T. of water. Set the pan over medium-low heat and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, until the pears are quite smooth. Scrape the softened pears into the carafe of a blender and puree until the skins disappear and the flesh is quite tender. Return the puree to the saucepan and place over low heat. Cook, stirring regularly, for 45 to 55 minutes, until the pear puree has thickened a great deal and sits up tall in the bowl of a spoon. If it’s not done, it will run to the edges of the spoon and will be no higher than the rim. Add the honey, lemon juice and zest, and cinnamon. Taste and adjust the sweet and tart levels. Remove the butter from the heat and funnel into the prepared jars, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Wipe the rims, apply the lids and rings, and process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

Strawberry Jam with Thai Herbs

Strawberry Jam with Thai Herbs

Makes 8 1/4 pint jars

9 C. clean strawberries diced (3 pounds)
1 1/2 C. sugar
3 tsp. fresh + strained or bottled lemon juice
2 tsp. cilantro
1.5 tsp. thai basil
1 tsp. mint (I used chocolate mint; use whatever you have)
1 tsp. lemon zest

Follow a proper recipe for water bath canning unless you know what you’re doing (e.g. sterilizing jars and lids and all that jazz.) There are tons online or you can get a book.

2. Put the strawberries and sugar into a large, ideally wide pot to aid in evaporating all that water. Bring to simmer and stir stir stir. Cook for about 5 minutes. Then pour the mixture into a colander with a bowl underneath it to catch the liquid and separate it from the fruit. Return the liquid to the pot and cook down boiling over high heat for 20 minutes until it reduces to around 1 + 1/2 C.. Something like it cuts in half. Or, if you’re like me, and fear the high heat boil, put it over medium heat and fret and worry that you might be smelling burning, letting a solid hour pass until it seems thickened enough. Put the fruit you set aside back into the pot with your thickened syrup. Add the lemon juice. Bring to a simmer. Stir frequently for about 25 minutes. If you’re lucky, and bold enough with the heat, it will somehow only take 15. You know it’s ready when a chilled plate from the freezer with a dab of jam, after being returned to the freezer for a minute, seems thickened and jam-like. If it’s sliding around post 1-minute freezer, it needs more time. In the meantime, get the boiling water ready for canning. Turn off the heat, add the herbs and lemon zest and stir it all in. Process the jam in the boiling water for 5 minutes, leaving the requisite 1/4 inch space at the top of each jar. Let rest for 12 hours. Make sure they sealed by trying to push down on each lid. But really, get some solid advice on canning if you haven’t done it before — this book is a great place to start. Canning is fun, and worth trying, and infinitely less dangerous than you might assume. Eat the jam, wondering if a single jar will make it to autumn.

Peach Jam with Lemon Thyme and Almonds

Peach Jam with Lemon Thyme and Almonds

Peach, Lemon Thyme and Almond Jam Perfect served with cheese plate, or a dollop of Creme fraiche and short bread cookies

½ C. slivered almonds
12 oz. (2 large) Granny Smith apples
4 pounds peaches, peeled, pitted and diced
1 ½ C. sugar
3T.lemon juice
2 tsp. fresh lemon thyme leaves

In a small skillet over medium-high heat, toast the almonds, stirring constantly until golden brown and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Remove to a plate and set aside. Cut the apples into quarters and core them. Tie the cores and seeds in a cheesecloth bag and set aside. Put the peaches and sugar in a wide, 6-8 quart preserving pan. Bring to a simmer, stirring frequently, and cook until the juices just cover the peaches. Pour into a colander set over a large bowl and stir the peaches gently to drain off the juice. Return the juice to the pan, along with the apples and cheesecloth bag, and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil, stirring occasionally, until the syrup is thick and reduced, about 15 minutes. Return the peaches and any accumulated juice to the pan, along with the lemon juice, almonds and thyme, and bring to a simmer. Simmer, stirring frequently, until the peaches are very tender and a small dab of the jam spooned onto the chilled plate and returned to the freezer for a minute becomes somewhat firm (it will not gel), about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir gently for a few seconds to distribute the fruit in the liquid. Remove the bag and the apples. Can using the water-bath method.

Tomato Jam

Tomato Jam

Makes 3 Pint Jars or 6 Half-Pint Jars or 12 – 4 oz. Jars

5 pounds tomatoes, cored and finely chopped
1 C. sugar** (see note below)
½ C. freshly squeezed lime juice
2 tsp. grated peeled fresh ginger
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
½ tsp. ground cloves
1 tsp. sea salt
1/2 tsp. red pepper flakes** (see note below)

Prepare water bath and jars. After water reaches boiling point, keep on low heat until needed. Place lids in a small saucepan, cover with water and place on very low heat. Tomatoes 032Combine all ingredients in a non-reactive pot. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce to low. Simmer the jam, stirring regularly, until it reduces to a consistency similar to jam. If you wish to test it, drop a tsp. onto a saucer. When cooled, the jam should stay in a mound. If it runs down the saucer when titled, it needs more cooking. This will take between 1 1/2 to 2 hours. When jam has cooked down sufficiently, remove pot from the heat and ladle jam into the prepared jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe the rims, apply the lids and rings, and process in a water bath for 20 minutes.

I used organic raw sugar in this recipe. I use less sugar than Marisa does in her recipe since I like to more tangy. It is shelf stable, however, because of the added acid. Marisa suggests 3 ½ C. but I find 1 C. gives it just the savory-ness I like.
I used ½ tsp. red pepper flakes which gives it a bit of heat but not over the top. Adjust to your taste preferences, as is true for all spices.

Violet Jelly

Violet Jelly

2 C. tightly packed violet flowers (no stems)
2 C. boiling water
1/4 C. bottled lemon juice
1 1/2 C. white sugar (again, white is essential to retain the violet color)
4 tsp. pectin

Rinse and drain flowers and place in a small stainless steel saucepan or heat-proof glass bowl. Pour over boiling water, cover and let steep for 24 hours. Strain the liquid through a fine mesh sieve into a medium saucepan, using a wooden spoon (or very clean hands) to squeeze out as much liquid as possible. Add lemon juice and gently heat over medium low heat until warm. In a small bowl, whisk sugar and pectin until well incorporated. Add sugar-pectin blend to violet water and whisk until completely dissolved. Turn heat up to medium high and bring mixture to a boil, stirring occasionally. You want to stay close to the pot because it does have a tendency to bubble over if left unattended. Continue cooking until mixture has thickened slightly, about 5-10 minutes, skimming off any foam as you go (there will be a lot). Jelly is ready when it passes the chilled plate test. Make sure all foam has been removed and ladle jelly into clean, hot, sterile jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe rims clean, center lids and screw on jar rings. Process in boiling water bath for 12 minutes. Remove jars and allow to cool for 24 hours. Press on center of lids after about 1 hour to make sure they’ve sealed. If the lid springs back, it did not seal properly and needs to be stored in the refrigerator. After 24 hours, label jars and store in pantry.

No Pectin Blueberry Maple Jam

No Pectin Blueberry Maple Jam

No Pectin Blueberry Maple Jam

 

All of that is a very long way to say that this jam can be runny. It’s relatively low sugar, doesn’t have added pectin and adds maple syrup. All of that generally leads to a very, very loose set – but something that really tastes of its ingredients, of the area and isn’t overtly sweet. This tastes like its core ingredients – wild blueberries and maple syrup.

 

This is a great ingredient for baking, pancakes, ice cream, smoothies or, my favorite use, as a cheese topping for goat cheese (chevre). It’s mad-good with cheese.

 

Ingredients

6 C. Blueberries

3 C. Brown Sugar

1 C. Maple Syrup

1/3 C. Bottled Lemon Juice (use the bottled stuff to be sure of the acidity).

 

Place berries in a wide pan. Crush berries with a potato masher. Add lemon, sugar and syrup, stir well. Let rest for an hour. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Stir frequently until jam is set – about 20 minutes after it starts boiling. Skim foam, pour into sterilized 1-C. (half-pint or 250 ml) jars and process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes. This is a magical taste of late summer and something I just simply adore.

Blueberry Maple Jam with Lemon

Blueberry Maple Jam with Lemon

Blueberry Maple Jam with Lemon

 

6 C. blueberries

3 C. brown sugar, lightly packed

Peels and cores (seeds included) of 3 apples

1 cinnamon stick

1 C. maple syrup

â…“ C. bottled lemon juice

1T.lemon zest, finely grated

 

Place the berries in a large pot, crush them lightly, and add the sugar. Stir to mix, cover, and rest for 1– 4 hours on the counter. Place the apple peels and cores and the cinnamon stick inside the cheesecloth to make a teabag. Place the teabag in a large pot with the blueberries, maple syrup, lemon juice, and lemon zest. Prepare your canning pot and rack, and sterilize your jars and lids Bring the fruit to a simmer over medium heat, skimming off any foam that appears. Cook until set, at least 20 minutes. Remove the teabag from the jam. Remove the jars from the canner and turn the heat to high. Using a funnel, pour the jam into the jars. Wipe the rims of the jars, apply the lids, and process for 10 minutes. Remove the jars and allow them to cool.

Spiced Rhubarb Chutney

Spiced Rhubarb Chutney

Spiced Rhubarb Chutney

 

This russet-red chutney is sweet, tart, spicy, and addictively delicious. I especially love it with Seeded Bread Crisps topped with a creamy brie or fresh chevre, or as an accompaniment to a savory cheesecake.

 

1 C. white balsamic vinegar

1 C. sugar

2 cinnamon sticks, broken with a mallet

2 tsp. cardamom pods, broken with a mallet

2 tsp. coarsely crushed black peppercorns

2 tsp. whole cloves

1 tsp. anise seeds

zest of 1 large orange

 

3 C. (14 oz.), trimmed, sliced rhubarb

½ C. plump raisins

 

½ tsp. vanilla

 

In a medium saucepan, combine vinegar and sugar, and bring to a simmer, whisking constantly to dissolve the sugar. Add the cinnamon, cardamom, peppercorns, cloves, anise seeds, and orange zest. Cover the pan tightly and macerate for at least 1 hour. Strain the liquid through a triple-mesh sieve into a clean saucepan. Discard the spent spices. Reheat the liquid and add the rhubarb and raisins. Bring to a slow simmer. Simmer slowly, stirring frequently, until the sauce thickens and the liquid reduces by half, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, and stir in the vanilla. Let cool, put into a storage container, cover, and refrigerate until cold.

Strawberry Lemon Lavender Honey Jam

Strawberry Lemon Lavender Honey Jam

Strawberry Lemon Lavender Honey Jam

 

1 lemon, zest and juice

4 C. sliced strawberries

3 T. Dutch Jell All Natural Lite pectin

12 heads of lavender, tied in a bundle.

1 1/2 C. mild honey

 

Put the lemon juice, lemon zest, berries, lavender, and pectin in a pot. (You can stir with the lavender bundle.) Bring to hard rolling boil. Boil for 1 minute. Remove the lavender bundle. Add honey. Bring to rolling boil and boil for 1 minute. Ladle into jars. BWB 10 minutes. Makes five 8-oz. jars. Notes: If you don’t want the odd lavender flower falling off into the jam, you can strip the flowers off and put them in a tea ball to steep in the jam as it cooks. I found it easier to just use the bundle to stir with as much as I could, then I switched to a spoon when I needed a stronger stirrer.

 

About the pectin: I’ve been using bulk pectin this year from my local Amish store. You can probably use 1 pkg / 3 T. Ball pectin as well or Sure-Jell. Keep in mind that strawberries often take more pectin than other fruit.

Hawaiian Jam

Hawaiian Jam

Hawaiian Jam

8 Peaches, peeled

3 lg Oranges

Pulp of 1 med. cantaloupe

1 Lemon

1 (8 1/2 oz.) can crushed Pineapple

Sugar

 

Chop all ingredients fine. Put oranges through food processor. Combine all with 3/4 C. sugar for every 1 C. of fruit. Mix well and let stand overnight. Next morning, gently cook mixture 1 hour, stirring frequently. Pour into hot jars and seal. Makes 8 pints.

Berry Christmas Jam

Berry Christmas Jam

Berry Christmas Jam

 

3 C. Fresh cranberries

1 md Seedless orange, peeled and quartered

1 pkg. (10 oz.) frozen sliced strawberries, slightly thawed

1/4 tsp. Ground cloves

1/4 tsp. Ground cinnamon

4 C. Sugar

1/2 C. Water

1 Pouch (3 oz.) liquid fruit pectin

 

In a food processor, combine the cranberries and orange quarters; process until coarsely chopped. Add strawberries, cloves and cinnamon; process until mixture is finely chopped. In a heavy large saucepan, combine fruit mixture, sugar and water until well blended. Stirring constantly over low heat, cook two minutes. Increase heat to high and bring mixture to a rolling boil. Stir in liquid pectin. Stirring constantly, bring to a rolling boil again and boil one minute. Remove from heat; skim off foam. Pour into heat resistant jars with lids. Makes about 3 pints of jam.

Pepper-Pear Chutney

Pepper-Pear Chutney

5 Bartlett pears, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 5 C.)
2 red bell peppers, seeded and finely chopped (about 1 1/2 C.)
1 lemon, seeded and finely diced
2 1/4 C. packed dark brown sugar
1 1/2 C. dried currants
1 C. apple cider vinegar
1/4 C. finely diced fresh ginger
1 garlic clove, minced
1 heaping tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper

Makes about 6 C.. Combine the pears, bell peppers, lemon, sugar, currants, vinegar, ginger, garlic, salt, and cayenne in a large saucepan. Simmer uncovered over low heat, stirring frequently, until the chutney has thickened and the pears have softened but still hold their shape, about 1 hour. Transfer the chutney to an airtight container and let cool to room temperature. Stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator, the chutney will keep for 1 month.