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Category: Condiments & Extras

Apple Core Syrup

Apple Core Syrup

Apple Core Syrup

 

Cores from 5 to 7 apples, no need to remove the seeds (peels if you have them)

1 C. granulated sugar

1/2 C. lightly packed light or dark brown sugar

 

To make the syrup: Place the cores (and peels, if using), the granulated sugar, and the brown sugar in a medium-size saucepan with 1 C. water. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce the heat, and allow the mixture to simmer, stirring occasionally, until the cores are softened and the syrup smells fragrant, 20 to 30 minutes.  Strain out the cores and return the syrup to the pan to keep it warm with the residual heat until you’re ready to eat. If you’d like it to be thicker, bring it back up to a boil, then reduce the heat, and allow the mixture to simmer until it is reduced and thickened to your liking.

Radish Butter

Radish Butter

Radish Butter

2 bunches large red radishes (around 20) grated on the large holes of a box grater

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons finely diced red onion

1 large clove garlic, minced

Salt and pepper to taste

 

After grating the radish, pat with paper toweling to dry it a bit. In a large sauté pan, cook the onion and garlic in the oil for a few minutes to soften. Add the radish and sauté over medium-high heat, stirring often, until the mixture softens and becomes a bit gooey. This will probably take 20 to 30 minutes.

Generously season with salt and add a little pepper. (I used 1 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp pepper) Use your judgement Cool and refrigerate for about an hour before serving on crackers, little toasts or cucumbers.

Furikake (Japanese Rice Seasoning)

Furikake (Japanese Rice Seasoning)

Furikake (ふりかけ) is a nutty, crunchy, umami-packed Japanese blend used to season rice. Although it’s referred to as a rice seasoning, furikake is literally the salt and pepper of the Japanese kitchen. It is so versatile that you can use the seasoning to instantly perk up any bland dishes.  You can find many different combinations and flavorings in furikake.  Here is a simple version to start.

Furikake

⅔ cup sesame seeds

3 sheets unseasoned nori (dried seaweed), about ¼ ounce

2 T. dried bonito flakes

2 tsp. sugar

2 tsp. Diamond Crystal (or 1½ tsp. Morton) kosher salt

 

In a dry pan or skillet, toast the sesame seeds over medium heat until lightly toasted, about 2 minutes, stirring often. (If your seeds are sold roasted, skip this step.) Transfer to a small bowl and let cool completely. If the nori sheets are not crisp enough to crumble easily, carefully toast them by waving them over a gas flame or placing under a broiler for a few seconds. In a food processor, combine the sesame seeds, nori, bonito flakes, sugar, and salt. Pulse 8 to 10 times or until mixture is well blended. Store in a sealable container in a cool, dry place for up to 1 month.

Blubarb Jam

Blubarb Jam

Blubarb Jam

7 C. rhubarb, chopped

4 1/4 C. blueberries

4 1/4 C. sugar

1/3 C. lemon juice

 

The night before you want to make the jam or the morning of. Add the rhubarb, blueberries, sugar and lemon juice to a large pot, stir to combine. Let macerate for 30 min. to overnight. Sterilize jars and lids. Place a small plate in the freezer.  When ready to make the jam place the pot with the fruit in it on the stove. Bring to a boil on medium-high heat and boil hard for 15-25 minutes or until you reached the setting point, stirring occasionally. At the setting point, the foam will have subsided and the bubbles will get larger looking like fish eyeballs.  Place a small amount of the jam (1 tsp.) on the freezer plate and place the plate back in the freezer for a few minutes to cool. If the jam seems very close then remove the pot from the heat while the plate is in the freezer. If the jam wrinkles when pushed with your finger the jam is done. If not return to a boil for 5 min. and repeat. Careful as the jam thickens it can start to burn so stir more frequently.  Ladle jam into hot jars to within 1/4″ of the top. Remove air bubbles and wipe the rim with a clean cloth. Place lids on and screw to tighten until finger-tip tight only. Place in a water bath canner and process for 10 min. or according to altitude.  When the jam has cooked for its allotted time removed the jars to a towel-lined counter to cool. You should hear the popping of the lids as they seal. That is a very satisfying sound. If any jars don’t seal refrigerate and eat right away.

 

Pectin Version

 

4 ½ C. rhubarb, chopped

2 1/2 C. fresh blueberries

3/4 C. water

1 T. lemon juice

4 1/2 C. of sugar

1 box of low-sugar or no-sugar pectin

8 jam jars for canning (8 oz size)

8 canning lids

 

Sterilize your canning jars, and canning lids. Drain on clean dishtowels and set aside. Fill canning pot with water and bring to a gentle boil— keep over heat throughout prep so it is ready when needed. Wash berries. Measure out blueberries in a bowl. Mush them so they get quite juicy but there are still chunks remaining (mushing releases the pectin needed to make jam). In a separate bowl, mix 1 box of pectin with U C. of the sugar. Measure out remaining sugar in another bowl. Boil rhubarb and water over high heat, cover and simmer for 5 minutes over medium heat. Add the mushed blueberries, lemon juice, and pectin and mix together. Bring to a boil then add sugar. Stir and bring back to a vigorous boil again, while stirring continuously. Boil hard while continuing to stir for 1 minute (and 1 minute only—if you want jam that will set, this is serious, people). Remove from heat, stir and ladle hot jam into sterilized jars, securing lids tightly. Place jam jars in your canning pot with gently boiling water and boil for 5 minutes (again, keep your time on this—too long may make your jam runny). Remove jam and allow to cool. Check lid seals once cooled—any tops that pop back when pressed should be refrigerated. Makes 7-8 8oz (1 C.) jars of jam

Naturally Pink Cauliflower Pickles

Naturally Pink Cauliflower Pickles

Naturally Pink Cauliflower Pickles

1 medium-small cauliflower (1½–2 pounds)

1 small beet

2 sprigs fresh dill or 2 dill flower heads or 1 teaspoon dried dillweed, divided

2 small cloves garlic, peeled and lightly smashed

1 teaspoon mustard seeds, divided

½ teaspoon cumin seeds, divided

½ teaspoon red chile pepper flakes, divided (optional)

1 cup white distilled or white wine vinegar

¾ cup water

1 tablespoon honey

2 teaspoons kosher or other non-iodized salt

 

Wash the cauliflower and remove any outer leaves. Cut it in half, and slice off the florets with a short length of the base attached. Aim for approximately 1-inch pieces. Peel the beet. Cut it in half and then into ½-inch-thick slices. Distribute the dill, garlic cloves, and spices between two clean pint canning jars. Pack in the cauliflower above the seasonings, adding half of the beet slices to each jar. Leave 1 inch of head space. Combine the vinegar, water, honey, and salt in a small pot. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the salt and honey. Skim off any foam that forms on the surface. Pour the hot brine over the other ingredients in the jars, fully covering them but still leaving ½ inch of head space. Screw on canning lids and process the jars in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes (adjust the canning time if you live at a high altitude—see the sidebar in the Boiling Water Bath Canning chapter). Wait at least one week before serving. During that time, not only will the flavors mellow and “marry,” but the beet juices will color the cauliflower.

Stovetop Applesauce

Stovetop Applesauce

Stovetop Applesauce

3 pounds apples

2 tablespoons sugar or 1½ tablespoons honey (optional)

½ cup water or apple juice

2 tablespoons lemon juice

 

Wash the apples. If you have a food mill or a food processor, you’ll use it later to deal with the peels. Otherwise, peel the apples. Remove the cores (save them to make Apple Scrap Vinegar). Chop the apples into chunks about an inch thick. Put the apples into a large pot. If you are using the sugar, add it to the apples; if you are using the honey, dissolve it in the water. Add the lemon juice and the water to the pot. Cook the apples over medium heat, stirring frequently, for 20 to 25 minutes until they are mushy. If you left the peels on, run the applesauce through a food mill to remove them, or puree in a food processor (Since a food processor can’t separate the skins from the pulp in the same manner as a food mill, it’s preferable to peel and seed apples before cooking. After the apples are cooked, use a slotted spoon to transfer apples to the bowl of the food processor. Pulse to create a smooth puree, adding a tablespoon or two of the cooking liquid, as needed. Flavor with cinnamon or sugar, if desired.). If you peeled the apples, you can either mash them with a potato masher or puree them in a blender or food processor. Homemade applesauce will keep, refrigerated, for 1 week, or in the freezer for 6 months. For longer storage at room temperature, fill clean, hot pint or half-pint jars with the applesauce, leaving ½ inch of head space. The applesauce should still be hot when you fill the jars. If you want to can applesauce that has already cooled or been in the refrigerator for a couple of days, first bring it to a boil over medium heat before filling the jars. Go around the insides of the filled jars with a table knife to remove any air bubbles. Wipe the rims of the jars clean. Screw on canning lids and process in a boiling water bath for 20 minutes.

 

Cranberry Applesauce

Cook 4 pounds apples with 1 ½ cups of frozen cranberries, ½ cup sugar, and ¼ cup brown sugar, and 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice.

 

Chunky Apricot Applesauce

Soak 1 cup dried apricots in hot water for about 10 minutes, or until softened. Remove from water and dice. Add diced apricots and about ¼ cup

sugar to 4 pounds apples in the last few minutes of the cooking time, stirring until sugar dissolves.

 

Pear Applesauce

Cook 2 pounds apples and 2 pounds pears, both quartered. Since pears have more natural juice than apples, this sauce will be a little thinner than classic applesauce. To compensate, add just a tablespoon or two of liquid to the fruit before cooking instead of the ¼ cup listed in the recipe

 

Plum Applesauce

Cook 2 pounds apples with 2 pounds halved and pitted plums, and ¼ cup sugar.

Fermented Apple Salsa

Fermented Apple Salsa

Fermented Apple Salsa

Make this with the firmest apples you can find for a crisp fruit salsa that combines sweet, sour, and salty flavors.

 

1/2 cup (120 ml) filtered or non-chlorinated water

2 tablespoons honey

2 T. Whey (optional, but useful)

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

1 teaspoon coriander seeds

1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds

2 teaspoons kosher or medium grain sea salt

1/2 cup (115 g) raisins

1/4 cup (60 g) thinly sliced onion

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 to 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme

3 cups (680 g) finely chopped apples

 

Whisk the water, honey, whey, apple cider vinegar, and salt until the honey and salt are completely dissolved. Lightly grind the coriander and caraway seeds with a mortar and pestle. Coarsely chop the raisins (you can skip this step if you like, but I think the texture of the salsa is better if you take the time). In a large bowl, mix together the apples, raisins, onion slices and all of the spices. Pack the combined ingredients into a clean glass quart jar. Pour the brine over the other ingredients. The brine should completely cover the solid ingredients: if it doesn’t, top off with a little filtered water. Put a lid on the jar, but loosely (you want the gases that develop during fermentation to be able to escape). Put a small plate under the jar to catch any overflow that may occur during fermentation. Leave the jar of apple salsa out at room temperature for 2 days. During that time, take the lid off at least once a day and look for signs of fermentation such as bubbles on the surface. You’ll see these especially if you press gently on the food. Your nose should also be able to detect a clean, sour smell developing. Once the apple salsa has been actively fermenting for at least 24 hours, transfer it to the refrigerator. You won’t need the plate under the jar any longer because the cold storage temperature will slow down fermentation so much that there shouldn’t be any overflow. Store the apple salsa on the top shelf of the main compartment, which has the coolest temperature within the refrigerator. This will help the apples keep their crunch longer. Wait at least a week longer before eating the salsa.

Peach and Rhubarb Jam

Peach and Rhubarb Jam

Peach and Rhubarb Jam

 

5 C. peeled, pitted, and chopped peaches (about 8 medium peaches)

4 C. trimmed and diced rhubarb, in 1/3-inch (9 mm) dice

5 C. granulated sugar, or a little less to taste

24 lemon seeds, tied in cheesecloth or placed in a tea strainer (from 3 lemons)

 

In a large bowl, combine the peaches, rhubarb, and sugar and stir well. Cover and let stand at room temperature for 12 hours, stirring occasionally, to draw out the peach juice and dissolve the sugar. Transfer the mixture to a heavy 8-quart (8-l) pot over medium heat. Add the lemon seeds and bring to a boil, stirring often and skimming any surface foam. Adjust the heat to maintain a steady but gentle boil and cook, stirring occasionally to prevent the fruit from sticking to the bottom of the pot, until the mixture thickens to a jam consistency and registers 220°F (105°C) on an instant-read thermometer, 45 to 60 minutes. While the jam is cooking, fill a large pot or canner, fitted with a rack, with enough water to cover the jars. Over high heat, bring the water to a boil. Reduce heat to maintain a simmer and place the clean, empty canning jars in the water for 10 minutes to sterilize them. When the jam is ready, use canning tongs to carefully remove the jars and drain any water inside. Alternatively, you can heat your jars in the dishwasher, however, you will still need the hot water bath ready for canning the jam. Remove the cheesecloth or tea strainer with the lemon seeds from the jam. Spoon the hot jam into the jars, filling to within 1/2 inch (12 mm) of the top. Wipe the rim clean with a towel dipped in hot water. Top the jars with the lids and twist on the screw bands. Set the jars, not touching one another, in the boiling water on the rack in the pot or canner. Make sure the water covers the jars by at least 1 inch (25 mm). Boil for 20 minutes, then turn off the heat and use tongs to transfer the jars to a rack to cool completely. When the jars are completely cool, press on the center of each lid. If the lid remains concave, the seal is good. Store the jars in a cool pantry for up to 1 year. If a lid failed the seal test, that simply means you get immediate gratification and should store the jar in the refrigerator and consume the jam within 3 weeks.

Mojo Marinade

Mojo Marinade

Mojo Marinade

5 garlic cloves minced

1 jalapeño very finely minced

1 handful fresh cilantro leaves about 3 T. finely chopped

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt adjust as desired

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper adjust as desired

2 limes juiced

1 orange juiced

2 T. white vinegar

1/2 C. olive oil

 

In a large bowl, combine the very finely minced garlic, jalapeño, cilantro, salt and pepper. Using a mortar and pestle or your hands, mash together and crush to make a paste. Scrape into a jar and then add the orange and lime juices, vinegar and oil. Shake really well to combine thoroughly. Use as a marinade for beef or chicken. Enjoy!

Fermented Mushrooms

Fermented Mushrooms

Fermented Mushrooms

1 or 2 8oz packages of mushrooms (I used about 1 and a half packages of sliced mushrooms)

Fresh thyme (a couple sprigs, depending on your taste)

Fresh marjoram (a couple sprigs, depending on your taste)

Smashed garlic (2 or 3 heads, depending on your tastes)

1 T. sea salt

1/4 teaspoon whey, sauerkraut juice, or culture starter

Filtered water

 

Place all of the ingredients into a quart sized mason jar.  Smash the mushrooms and other goodies down into the jar to get as many in there as you can. Add filtered water to cover, leaving an inch of head space at the top. Weigh down your mushrooms because they like to float! Set on your counter for 3 to 5 days.

Move to your refrigerator. Tamara and Kelly recommend adding them to morning eggs and to salads. I think they would be great on an antipasti platter, or taken along on a picnic.

Canning Steak Sauce

Canning Steak Sauce

Canning Steak Sauce

1 C. ketchup (homemade)

1/2 C. onion, coarsely chopped

1 large clove garlic

1/4 C. water

1/4 C. Worcestershire sauce

1/4 C. lemon juice (bottled)

1/4 C. white vinegar

2 T. soy sauce

2 T. brown sugar

1 T. prepared mustard

 

Cooking: Combine all ingredients in saucepan and simmer uncovered for 30 minutes or until it reaches a good consistency, stirring occasionally. Strain to remove onion and garlic. Filling the jars:  On a dishtowel place your hot jars. Using your funnel in each jar ladle the mixture into the jars leaving 1/2” headspace.  Remove air bubbles and refill to the proper headspace if necessary. Taking a clean paper towel wet it with warm water and wipe the rims of the jars removing any food particles that would interfere with a good seal. Using your magic wand to extract the lids from the hot water and place them on the now cleaned rims. Add your rings to the tops of each of the jars and turn to seal just “finger tight”.   Processing: Make sure your rack is on the bottom of the canner and place the jars in the water bath making sure that the water covers each of the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add hot water to the canner if it doesn’t measure up. Cover the pot and turn up the heat under the canner and wait for the water to start boiling. Once the water has come to a boil start your timer for 15 minutes. When complete turn off the heat and remove the cover and let the jars sit for another few minutes. Remove the jars and place them back on the dishtowel in a place that they will sit overnight to cool. Do not touch or move them till the next morning. Sealing: Some time in the next hour your jars will be making a “pinging” or “popping” noise. That is the glass cooling and the reaction of the lids being sucked into the jar for proper sealing. Some recipes may take overnight to seal. Check your lids and reprocess any jars that did not seal.

Rootbeer Jelly

Rootbeer Jelly

Rootbeer Jelly

4 1/4 C. rootbeer soda

4 1/2 C. sugar

1 pkg. or 6 T. powdered pectin

2 T. bottled lemon juice

1/4 tsp. butter

 

Combine the root beer soda and lemon juice in a large stock pot. Sprinkle the powdered pectin on top of the juice mixture and use a whisk to mix it together. Stirring constantly, heat until boiling. Boil for one minute. Add the butter and return to a boil. Add the sugar to the pot all at one time (measure it and have it ready ahead of time). Stir until sugar is dissolved. Return to a boil and boil for one minute. Remove the pan from the heat. Remove any foam with a metal spoon. Ladle the jelly into hot sterilized canning jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space, and process in boiling water canner for 10 minutes. Remove jars from canner and set the jars on the counter on a kitchen towel to cool.

Pickled Sweet Peppers

Pickled Sweet Peppers

Pickled Sweet Peppers

1 pound small sweet peppers, thinly sliced (about 4 cups)

3 large shallots, sliced into rings

1 1⁄2 C. white wine vinegar

1⁄2 C. water

2 cloves garlic, smashed

1⁄4 C. plus 1 T. sugar

1 T. plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt

1⁄2 teaspoon crushed red pepper

 

Divide peppers and shallot evenly between jars. Set aside. In a medium saucepan, bring vinegar, 1⁄2 C. water, garlic, sugar, salt, and red pepper to a boil over medium-high heat. Remove from heat; discard garlic. Divide vinegar mixture evenly between jars. Seal jars, and let cool to room temperature. Refrigerate 24 hours or up to 1 month.

Small Batch Strawberry Rhubarb Jam with Rose Flower Water

Small Batch Strawberry Rhubarb Jam with Rose Flower Water

Small Batch Strawberry Rhubarb Jam with Rose Flower Water

1 pound strawberries

1 pound rhubarb stalks

1 1/4 cups granulated sugar

2 tablespoons rose flower water

 

Wash the strawberries and rhubarb well. Hull the berries and dice them into small pieces. Chop the rhubarb into segments approximately 1/2 inch in size. Place the chopped fruit in a glass or ceramic bowl and cover with sugar. Stir to combine and cover. Let the fruit sit for at least an hour, until the juices are flowing. I often pop the bowl into the refrigerator at this point and cook the jam the following day. When you’re ready to cook the jam, prepare a small boiling water bath canner and three half pint jars and bring it to a boil. Place three new canning jar lids in a small pot and bring them to a bare simmer. Pour the fruit and all the liquid into your jam pot and place it over high heat. For these small batches, I like to use a 12-inch, stainless steel skillet, but any low, wide, non-reactive pan will do. Bring the fruit to a rapid boil and stir regularly. Over high heat, this jam should take 8 to 12 minutes to cook. It is done when it is quite thick. You can tell that it’s ready when you draw your spoon or spatula through the jam, and it doesn’t immediately rush in to fill that space. It will also make a vigorous sizzling noise when stirred when it is finished. When the jam appears to be finished, stir in the rose flower water. Stir until it is incorporated and cook for an additional 30 seconds. The flower water is added at this point so you don’t evaporate all the fragrance during cooking. Remove the jam from the heat and funnel it into the prepared jars. Wipe rims, apply lids and rings, and process in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes (start your timer when the water returns to a boil, not the moment the jars go into the water bath). When time is up, remove jars from canner and set them to cool on a folded kitchen towel. When they are cool enough to handle, remove the rings and test the seals by grasping the edges of the lid and lifting the jar an inch or so from the countertop. If the lid holds fast, the jars are sealed. Any unsealed jars should be refrigerated and eaten promptly.

Pickling Dandelion Roots

Pickling Dandelion Roots

Pickling Dandelion Roots

The sunny flowerheads may be long gone, but the roots that remain are loaded with nutrients and flavor. Pickled dandelion roots are a tasty addition to soups and salads in fall. And here’s another break—this recipe also uses refrigeration to pickle instead of heat.

 

generous handful dandelion roots, washed and chopped

3 cloves garlic

2 teaspoons powdered ginger root

¼ C. tamari

3 ½ C. apple cider vinegar

 

Place clean roots, ginger root powder and tamari in a 1-quart mason jar. Pour the vinegar over all. Place a piece of wax paper over the mouth of the jar (this prevents rusting) and screw down the lid. Place in the refrigerator for 3 weeks before using.  Add to salads.

 

A different Version

 

3 C. white vinegar, one C. water, 2 T. of pickling salt, and a 1/2 C. sugar

 

Put it in a saucepan and bring it to a boil. At the same time that I am doing this, I am sterilizing my jars and lids by letting them sit in boiling water for 10-15 minutes (I start heating the pot of water long before this though, since my huge pot takes forever to boil!)

 

Once the jars are sterilized, and before I pack in the dandelion roots, I fill them with these spices: (sorry I’m not very exact with the measurements, I just eyeball everything.

 

a couple whole cloves of garlic, a pinch of celery seed, 6 to 8 peppercorns, a pinch of cayenne or red chile pepper flakes, a pinch of mustard seeds, and some dill (preferably fresh)

 

So in the spices go, then the roots (which you really got to pack in there!), then the pickling brine. Fill up the jars to about a 1/4 inch from the rim, give the rims a quick wipe down (spices stuck to the rim can cause the lid to not seal properly), and throw on the lids…

 

Now that all of the hard stuff is over, you’re ready to let your jars sit in boiling water for a final 20 minutes or so…. and YAY, YOU’R DONE! … (after you remove them, don’t forget to let them sit on your counter overnight to give the lids a chance to “pop”, or seal)

Simple Tomato-Basil Jam

Simple Tomato-Basil Jam

Simple Tomato-Basil Jam

5 pounds or approximately 12 cups of tomatoes

1 tablespoon sea salt

3 cups granulated sugar

1/2 cup basil, chopped

 

Wash and slice cherry tomatoes, or chop large tomatoes. Toss and massage with salt. Let sit for 30 minutes to let juices from tomato flow out. Sterilize your jars and lids in hot water while you wait.

Discard the juice, and dump strained tomatoes into a large, wide, shallow pan. Add sugar and lemon juice. Simmer with lid off on medium-low heat. Check and stir occasionally. Once tomatoes start to thicken, watch and stir more often that it doesn’t burn. When it’s thick to your liking, anywhere to between a syrup or jam consistency (I like mine thicker), remove from heat and stir in the basil. Spoon into sterilized jars, wiping brims of any jam residue before applying lids and rings. Process in water bath for 10 minutes, then remove and let cool. You will hear the lids pop as they seal vacuum tight. Any jars that don’t seal properly can be stored in the fridge and used first. The rest will last a year or more stored in a dark cool place.

Dandelion Jelly

Dandelion Jelly

Dandelion Jelly

2 c. dandelion flowers (harvested from pesticide free location)

4 c. sugar

1 pkg. or 6 T. powdered pectin

2 T. lemon juice

1/4 tsp. butter

 

Rinse dandelions in a colander and remove stems by snipping them off with a pair of kitchen scissors. Place dandelions in a bowl and cover them with 4 C. of boiling water. You are essentially going to make “dandelion tea.”  After the water cools off, place the bowl of water and dandelions in the refrigerator until the next day. It was two days until I got back to mine, but it was just fine. The next day, run the mixture through a fine mesh strainer to remove the pieces of dandelion. You should end up with a clear liquid. If not, try pouring it through the strainer again. Measure the tea, adding a little water if necessary to get exactly 4 C. of liquid. Pour liquid into a large stock pot. Stir in lemon juice. Sprinkle the pectin on top of the juice and use a whisk to mix it together. Stirring constantly, heat until boiling. Boil for one minute. Add the pinch of butter and return to a boil. Add the sugar to the pot all at one time (measure it and have it ready ahead of time). Stir until sugar is dissolved. Return to a boil and boil for one minute. Remove the pan from the heat. Remove any foam with a metal spoon. Ladle the jelly into hot sterilized jars, leaving ¼ inch head space, and process in a boiling water canner for 5 minutes. Remove jars from canner and place on a towel on the kitchen counter to cool. Lids will make a pinging noise when they seal. If a jar does not seal, place it in the refrigerator and eat in the next couple of weeks. Cooled sealed jars can be stored in the pantry for several years.

Green Tomato Jam

Green Tomato Jam

Green Tomato Jam

4 pounds green tomatoes (2 1/2 pounds net)

4 1/3 C. superfine sugar

Juice (and zest) of two small lemons

 

Rinse tomatoes in cold water. Dry them with towel. Cut in wedges and remove juice, seeds and the white center parts. Dice tomatoes. In a bowl, combine the tomato pieces, sugar and lemon juice. Cover with plastic wrap and let macerate overnight. The next day, pour this mixture into a preserving pan (large bottomed large surface area copper pot/pan). Bring to a boil and on low heat cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Pour back into the bowl. cover with plastic wrap and again refrigerate overnight. The third day, bring the mixture to a boil, skim if necessary and continue cooking in low heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Check the set and cook a bit more if needed. Put the jam into jars immediately and seal (or for small batches, just refrigerate).

Canning Stewed Rhubarb

Canning Stewed Rhubarb

Canning Stewed Rhubarb

12 C. Sliced Rhubarb

1 ½ C. Sugar

 

In a large pot combine the rhubarb and sugar, mixing well. Cover and let stand until juice begins to release from the fruit. While the fruit stands, get the boiling water canner going and get jars, lids, and rings ready. Once some water has started to release from the rhubarb, bring it to a gentle boil, stirring to prevent scorching. Ladle the stewed rhubarb into hot jars leaving 1/2″ headspace. Clean rims; put on lids and rings. Process in a boiling water bath canner for 15 minutes, adjusting for elevation.

 

Notes: Scale the recipe up or down by figuring 1/2 C. sugar for every 4 C. of chopped rhubarb

 

These beautiful jars are a simple addition to many meals in winter:

 

  • Use as a pancake / waffle topping instead of syrups
  • Mix in with oatmeal and other hot cereals for a flavorful, fruity punch
  • Top ice cream, poundcake, or sweet shortcake biscuits for an easy dessert
  • Dumplings! Put a jar or two into a pot and heat, add dumpling batter and cook until the dumplings are cooked and fluffy.
  • Stir into homemade yogurt
  • Pour a jar or two into the bottom of a pie plate and top with oats and melted butter for a crisp-style dessert.
Pressure Canning Chicken Stock

Pressure Canning Chicken Stock

Pressure Canning Chicken Stock

1 3- to 4-lb chicken, cut into pieces

16 C. water

2 stalks celery

2 medium onions, quartered

1 T. salt

10 peppercorns

2 bay leaves

4 Ball®  (32 oz) quart or 8 (16 oz) pint glass preserving jars with lids and bands

 

Half recipe

1/2  3- to 4-lb chicken, cut into pieces

8 C. water

1 stalks celery

1 medium onions, quartered

1-1/2 T. salt

5 peppercorns

1 bay leaves

2 Ball®  (32 oz) quart or 4 (16 oz) pint glass preserving jars with lids and bands

 

*You must process at least 2 quart jars or 4 pint jars in the pressure canner at one time to ensure safe processing.*

 

Prepare pressure canner. Heat jars in simmering water until ready for use. Do not boil.  Wash lids in warm soapy water and set bands aside Combine chicken and water in a large sauce-pot. Bring to a boil. Add remaining ingredients. Return to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 2 hours or until chicken is tender. Remove from heat. Skim off foam. Remove chicken from stock, reserving chicken for another use. Strain stock through a sieve or several layers of cheesecloth. Allow stock to cool until fat solidifies. Skim off fat. Heat stock to a boil. Ladle hot chicken stock into hot jars leaving 1 inch headspace. Wipe rim. Center hot lid on jar. Apply band and adjust until fit is fingertip tight. Process filled jars in a pressure canner at 10 pounds pressure 20 minutes for pints and 25 minutes for quarts, adjusting for altitude, according to your pressure canners directions. Turn off heat: cool canner to zero pressure. Let stand 5 more minutes before removing the lid. Cool jars in canner 10 minutes. Remove jars and cool. Check lids for seal after 24 hours. Lid should not flex up and down when center is pressed.

Red Plum Jam

Red Plum Jam

Red Plum Jam

5 C. red plums about 2 pounds

3 C. sugar

3/4 C. water

 

3 pint canning jars

3 lid and ring sets

Water bath canner

Canning tool set

 

Prepare jars according to the water bath canning directions. Chop plums into small-ish pieces. Leave them larger if you like your jam a little more chunky. Combine chopped plums, sugar, and water in a large pot. Bring to a boil slowly, stirring until sugar is completely dissolved. Turn up the heat and bring to jelly stage quickly. (220°) As jam thickens, stir frequently to prevent sticking. Remove from heat. If foam as formed on top, skim it off. Ladle hot jam into jars, leaving a 1/4 inch headspace. Finish jars and process jam according to water bath canning instructions for 15 minutes. Notes: Jams and Jellies must be made in small batches, or the finished product will not set up.

Spicy Pickled Swiss Chard Stems

Spicy Pickled Swiss Chard Stems

Spicy Pickled Swiss Chard Stems

One large bunch of rainbow chard stems, cleaned and cut to fit into mason jar, about 3/4 inch from the lip

1/2 C. rice wine vinegar

3/4 C. distilled white vinegar

1/4 C. sugar or 3 T. maple syrup

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1 1/2 T. sriracha

1/4 teaspoon celery seed, divided

1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns, divided

1/2 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds, divided

2 cloves garlic, divided

 

Add each half of the celery seed, peppercorns, mustard seeds, and garlic to each jar. (If just making one jar, this can all go together.) Pack chard stems tightly into jars. Bring vinegars, sugar (or maple syrup), salt, and sriracha to a boil, in a small saucepan until sugar and salt is dissolved. Then pour over chard stems. Let sit until cool, then put lids on and refrigerate. Wait two days before eating for flavors fully develop. Will last 1 month in refrigerator.

Easy French Apple Jam

Easy French Apple Jam

Easy French Apple Jam

about 6 apples (I mixed Granny Smith and Honeycrisp)

2 1/2 C. sugar

5 cardamom pods crushed (use a rolling pin or heavy spoon to gently crack open the pods)

juice of 2 lemons divided

2 T. pectin powder this is totally optional, the jam will set without it

 

Fill a large bowl with cold water and add the juice of 1 lemon. Peel, core, and quarter the apples and add them to the lemon water as you work. Remove the apples from the water (discard the water) and finely dice them. Add the apples to a heavy bottomed pot, along with the sugar, cardamom pods, (and any seeds that have escaped) the pectin (if using) and the juice of the other lemon. Stir well, and then bring to a boil. Boil, uncovered and stirring often, for about 30-40 minutes until thickened. About halfway through the cooking I used my stick blender to blend the jam just a bit, but I left lots of apple chunks intact. This is optional and depends on what texture you want your jam to have, and how large or small you chopped your apples in the first place. If you do this, be extra careful not to splatter yourself, the jam is very hot. Ladle the finished jam into clean (sterilized) jars, cover tightly, and let cool before refrigerating. See note below for preserving options.

 

Make it your own

 

  • To can this jam you can follow the instructions from the Ball® website: Ladle hot jam into hot jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar. Apply band until fit is fingertip tight. Process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude. Turn off heat and remove cover. Let jars cool 5 minutes. Remove jars from canner, do not retighten bands if loose. Cool 12 hours. Check seals. Label and store jars.
  • Add a few cranberries for a fresh flavor or mix the apples with pears.
  • Double or triple the cardamom for a delicious spread to serve with cheese and crackers.
Rhubarb Vanilla Bean Jelly

Rhubarb Vanilla Bean Jelly

Rhubarb Vanilla Bean Jelly

2 and 1/2 pounds rhubarb washed, trimmed, and sliced

1/2 C. water

7 C. granulated sugar

2 T. lemon juice

seeds of 1 vanilla bean

2 pouches 3 ounces each of liquid pectin

 

Puree the rhubarb in your Vitamix blender or food processor, along with the water to get it started. You may need to do this in 2 batches. Put the rhubarb puree into a clean jelly or nut bag, and let it hang over a large bowl to allow the juice to drip out. Don’t press or squeeze the bag aggressively or the pulp may come through and this will make your jelly cloudy. I do squeeze it a little bit, though, to move it along. It can help to have a jelly strainer, which is made for this purpose. You want to end up with 3 1/2 C. liquid. Put the rhubarb juice in a large stainless steel pot or saucepan. Stir in the sugar, the lemon juice, and the vanilla bean seeds. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring almost constantly. Once the mixture has reached a full rolling boil, let it fully boil for 3 minutes. It may foam up so stay right by it. Stirring is ok. After 3 minutes, stir in the pectin, and bring it back to a full, rolling boil. Boil 1 minute. Again it may foam up so be careful. Take the jelly off the heat and skim off any foam that is on the surface. Fill your sterilized jars to within 1/4 inch of the top. If you care canning: Wipe down the rims of the jars to remove any spilled jelly, then attach the lids and screw them, but don’t over-tighten. Process for 10 minutes in a boiling-water canner. If you aren’t canning: Let cool and then cap and refrigerate.

Peach Butter

Peach Butter

Peach Butter

4 lb. fresh peaches, (about 10 good sized peaches)

1/2 C. sugar

1/2 C. water, (if your peaches are juicy omit the water)

2 T. fresh lemon juice

 

Peel and rough chop the peaches. Add the peaches to a heavy pot along with the water and sugar. Heat on medium, stirring to dissolve the sugar. When the mixture comes to a boil, lower the heat slightly and cook for about 20 minutes until the peaches are completely tender. Stir occasionally. Add the lemon juice to the peaches, and then, working in batches, puree the fruit until it is completely smooth. Don’t rush this step, let the processor or blender run long enough to get all of the lumps. At this point I strain the puree through a mesh strainer just to make sure it is completely smooth. Push it firmly with the back of a spoon to get all the puree through. Discard any lumps. If your puree is smooth enough, you can skip this step (use the vitamix). Put the puree back into the (rinsed out) pan and bring back up to a boil. Lower the heat and cook gently until it is greatly reduced and thickened. This will take about 25-30 minutes or so, depending on the size of your pan. Stir very frequently during this step so the fruit doesn’t scorch. I like to use a splatter screen because it does splatter. TIP: The longer you cook the peach puree, the thicker the butter will be. You know it’s ready when it starts to darken slightly, and your stirring starts to leave trails in the mixture. Test it by dipping a spoon in, and then run your finger down the spoon, if the butter doesn’t fill in the strip, it’s ready. Ladle the hot peach butter into a clean jar or jars and let cool before capping and refrigerating. The peach butter will thicken as it cools. Consume within a couple of weeks. If you would like to can this recipe: Follow safe canning practices and ladle hot peach mixture into sterilized jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims. Close lids to fingertip-tight. Place jars in boiling-water canner and process jars 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude. Turn off heat; remove lid, and let jars stand 5 minutes. Remove jars and cool.

Vanilla Pear Sauce

Vanilla Pear Sauce

Vanilla Pear Sauce

15-20 pears, unpeeled, sliced and cored

1/2 to 1 C. white sugar

1 T. lemon juice

1 tsp. high quality cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick

2 vanilla bean, split and scraped

 

Place pears in large stock pot or french dutch oven over medium heat. Do not peal pears, the skin has a lot of flavor and nutrition you don’t want to miss out on. Don’t be afraid to fill the pan up to the top, they will cook down to about half their original size. Split the vanilla beans lengthwise with a sharp knife and put the whole thing in the pears and stir. Once the pears start to cook down, add the rest of the ingredients until everything comes to a boil. Reduce heat to low and put the lid on the pan. Simmer for 30 to 60 minutes until pears are very soft. Remove vanilla beans and discard. Drain most of the liquid into a C. (so you have some to thin out the sauce or so you can drink it, it’s very tasty). While still warm, mash the pears for a chunky consistency or blend in the blender for a smooth consistency (I prefer smooth). Place in clean canning jars and process in a water bath canner. These make great gifts and add a special flare to any meal.

Zucchini “Pineapple”

Zucchini “Pineapple”

Zucchini “Pineapple”

You need to peel your zucchini.  I cut mine up in smaller sizes as it’s much easier to handle. Now, take out all the seeds.  A melon baller is easy to use for this.  Then cut up your zucchini into the size you want.  If you want to have “crushed pineapple” then just grate it up.   In a large pot add 46 oz. canned unsweetened pineapple juice, 1 1/2 C. bottled lemon juice and 3 C. of sugar.  Then add your zucchini. Bring it to a boil and then simmer for 20 minutes. Fill your hot, clean pint size jars with the zucchini and liquid.  Leave 1/2 inch headspace.  Adjust your lids and process in a water bath for 15 mins. Remove and wait for the ping sound.

 

The recipe actually calls for you to use 4 quarts of zucchini but I only used the one large one so I had extra liquid left over and I only got 4 pints of zucchini pineapple.  If you use the 4 quarts of zucchini you should get 8-9 pints. If you are like me and don’t use all the zucchini you will be left with at least 1/2 the liquid and you can make jelly from it by adding pectin to it.

Fermented Cherry Tomato Bombs

Fermented Cherry Tomato Bombs

Fermented Cherry Tomato Bombs

4 C. under ripe cherry tomatoes

1 sprig fresh parsley

2 stems fresh basil

4 cloves garlic, peeled

1/4 teaspoon peppercorns

1/4 teaspoon coriander seeds

1/4 teaspoon mustard seeds

4 C. unchlorinated water

3 T. kosher, pickling, or sea salt, do not use iodized table salt

 

Put the peppercorns, coriander seeds, and mustard seeds into the bottom of a quart-sized jar, then layer in the tomatoes, parsley, basil, and garlic. Mix together the water and salt to make a brine, and pour over the tomatoes, making sure to cover them completely. Use a weight to keep the tomatoes under the brine, and cover the jar with a towel. Put in a cool and dark corner to ferment for 6-8 days. Taste them along the way. When the tomatoes are finished fermenting they will burst with a champagne like effervescence in your mouth. Cover with a lid and store in the fridge. They are best after 1 to 2 weeks. Notes: These cherry bombs will continue to gain effervescence even under refrigeration. The pressure is not in the jar, but in the tomatoes themselves! Refrigerate for up to 6 months.

Pear Jam with Honey

Pear Jam with Honey

Pear Jam with Honey

1/2 C. water

1/2 tsp. calcium powder

 

4 C. pears, peeled, cored and mashed

3/4 C. honey

1/4 C. lemon or lime juice

3 tsp. pectin powder

4 tsp. calcium water

 

Mix water and calcium powder together. Store in a sealed jar in the refrigerator and shake before each use. Will keep for a few months sealed tightly.

 

Peel and core pears. Mash using a potato masher or large fork. Stir mashed fruit, lemon or lime juice and calcium water into a medium sized pot. In a separate bowl, mix together the pectin powder and honey. Bring fruit mixture to a boil and add the honey-pectin mixture. Stir for 1-2 minutes and then return to a boil. Once boiling, remove from heat Sanitize jars, lids and rings. Fill jars to 1/4″ of top, clean rims and carefully attach lid and twist rings on. Put filled jars into a boiling pot of water and process for 10 minutes.

Add an extra minute for every 1000 ft above sea level. Remove from water and let cool. Lids should be “sucked” down.

Tomato-Basil Jam

Tomato-Basil Jam

Tomato-Basil Jam

2 ½ pounds ripe tomatoes, peeled

¼ cup lemon juice

3 tablespoons snipped fresh basil

3 cups sugar

1 1.75 ounce package powdered fruit pectin for lower-sugar recipes or 3 tablespoons powdered fruit pectin for low- or no-sugar recipes

 

 

Seed, core, and finely chop tomatoes. Measure 3 1/2 cups chopped tomatoes; place in a 6- to 8-quart stainless-steel, enamel, or nonstick heavy pot. Bring to boiling, stirring occasionally; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Measure 3 1/3 cups tomatoes; return to pot. Stir in lemon juice and basil. In a small bowl combine 1/4 cup of the sugar and the pectin; stir into tomato mixture. Bring to a full rolling boil, stirring constantly. Stir in the remaining 2 3/4 cups sugar. Return to a full rolling boil, stirring constantly. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and quickly skim off foam with a metal spoon. Ladle hot jam into hot sterilized half-pint canning jars, leaving a 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims; adjust lids and screw bands. Process filled jars in a boiling-water canner for 5 minutes (start timing when water returns to boiling). Remove jars from canner; cool on wire racks. Makes 5 half-pints.

Blueberry Lemon Basil Jam

Blueberry Lemon Basil Jam

Blueberry Lemon Basil Jam

3 pounds of blueberries, stems removed

1 1/2 C. of sugar

2 T. of lemon juice

Zest of 2 lemons

3/4 C. of water

10 basil leaves

1 T. of powdered pectin

 

To start, stick a small plate into your refrigerator to chill. This is used to test the jam constancy later on. In a great big bowl, you’re going to mix up the blueberries with the sugar, lemon juice and lemon zest. Allow to sit for a bit. While it’s sitting, get your jars together and start preparing them. Prepare your jars for canning – I use a ball canning kit so I just followed the directions on the insert. I used two mason jars and 2 old small jelly jars I’d been saving for the photos. (seen in photo) Four Mason jars should work sufficiently for you. Depending on your canning equipment on hand, you might need to purchase a canning kit to properly prepare your jars for canning. In a small piece of cheese cloth, lay the basil leaves on top and smash, and slice them up a bit so they release their full flavor. Tie the cheesecloth closed with some kitchen twine or string. In a medium pot on medium heat on the stove, add the blueberry mixture and the basil cheesecloth package with the water. Heat the mixture to a boil. Once the mixture is boiling, mash the berries up so they are no longer chunky. You can use whatever you want to mash them, I just used the back of a spoon. You want the mixture to be much smoother. Don’t hesitate to smash that bag of basil down into the blueberry either, just to get some more of that flavor in. Boil the entire mixture for about 20 minutes or so. Be sure and stir it up frequently so it doesn’t stick and it’s evenly cooked. At the end of 20 minutes, use a spoon to skim off the foam that collects on top. Remove as much as you can. It all has to go. Reduce your heat to a low simmer (make sure it’s still bubbling) and continue skimming off the foam and stirring often until the jam thickens. If you don’t stir often enough, and the jam begins to thicken, you will burn the jam. To get to the properly thickened stage, it took me to about the 45 minute mark but can take more than an hour to accomplish. Stir in the pectin at this point and stir well. You can now test the jam with the plate we put in the refrigerator. Grab the plate and plop a small spoonful onto the plate and then stick it back into the refrigerator for about a minute. Remove and tilt the plate a bit to the side. If the jam runs, it’s not ready. It should stay right where it is. If it’s not ready, continue cooking and stirring and add a little more pectin if needed, but often if you just give it a bit more time it will thicken and gel. When the jam is finally ready, remove the cheesecloth filled with the basil with a slotted spoon. You can throw this all away. Using a ladle with a spout, ladle the jam into your jam jars leaving about a 1/4 inch of room between the jam and the top of the jar. Screw on the lids (be careful jars are VERY hot). Submerge them in rapidly boiling water for an additional 5 minutes. When they are done, remove them from the water and listen for the audible sound which will let you know they are sealed. It’s a weird kind of pop sound with a little metal ring to it and sometimes isn’t very loud. Allow the jam to sit for at least 24 hours before using.

Pickled Dandelion Capers

Pickled Dandelion Capers

Pickled Dandelion Capers

2 C. dandelion buds (tiny, just barely produced, no flower inside yet, pick primary bed, then under are secondaries.

2/3 C. vinegar

1/3 C. water

1 tsp. salt

Bring the water, vinegar and salt to a boil and stir to dissolve the salt.  Pack the capers into mason jars, and pour the brine over the top. Cap and store in the refrigerator or process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace.

Blubarb Jam

Blubarb Jam

Blubarb Jam

4 1⁄2 C. rhubarb, chopped

2 1⁄2 C. fresh blueberries

3⁄4 C. water

1 T. lemon juice

4 & 1/2 C. of sugar

1 box of low-sugar or no-sugar pectin

 

8 jam jars for canning (8 oz size)

8 canning lids

 

Sterilize your canning jars, and canning lids. Drain on clean dishtowels and set aside. Fill canning pot with water and bring to a gentle boil; keep over heat throughout prep so it is ready when needed. Wash berries. Measure out blueberries in a bowl. Mush them so they get quite juicy but there are still chunks remaining (mushing releases the pectin needed to make jam). In a separate bowl, mix 1 box of pectin with M C. of the sugar. Measure out remaining sugar in another bowl. Boil rhubarb and water over high heat, cover and simmer for 5 minutes over medium heat. Add the mushed blueberries, lemon juice, and pectin and mix together. Bring to a boil then add sugar. Stir and bring back to a vigorous boil again, while stirring continuously. Boil hard while continuing to stir for 1 minute (and 1 minute only—if you want jam that will set, this is serious, people). Remove from heat, stir and ladle hot jam into sterilized jars, securing lids tightly. Place jam jars in your canning pot with gently boiling water and boil for 5 minutes (again, keep your time on this—too long may make your jam runny). Remove jam and allow to cool. Check lid seals once cooled—any tops that pop back when pressed should be refrigerated.

Berry-Basil Limeade Jam

Berry-Basil Limeade Jam

Berry-Basil Limeade Jam

8 C. fresh strawberries, hulled

1 package (1-3/4 ounces) powdered fruit pectin

1/3 C. lime juice

1 tsp. butter

7 C. sugar

1/4 C. minced fresh basil

4 tsp. grated lime zest

 

Rinse nine 1-C. plastic or freezer-safe containers and lids with boiling water. Dry thoroughly. In a small bowl, thoroughly crush strawberries, 1 C. at a time, to measure exactly 5 C.; transfer to a 6-qt. stockpot. Stir in pectin, lime juice and butter. Bring to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Stir in sugar; return to a full rolling boil. Boil and stir 1 minute. Immediately stir in basil and lime zest. Immediately fill all containers to within 1/2 in. of tops. Wipe off top edges of containers; immediately cover with lids. Let stand at room temperature 24 hours. Jam is now ready to use. Refrigerate up to 3 weeks or freeze up to 12 months. Thaw frozen jam in refrigerator before serving. Yield: 8-1/2 C..

Kahlua Spiked Pecans

Kahlua Spiked Pecans

Kahlua Spiked Pecans

1 C. granulated sugar

1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/2 tsp. salt

1 large egg white

3 T. Kahlua

4 C. pecan halves

 

Preheat oven to 325F. In a small bowl, whisk together sugar, cinnamon, and salt. In a large bowl, whisk together egg white and Kahlua. Add pecans and stir well to combine. Sprinkle half the sugar mixture on top and mix well. Pour the rest of the sugar on top and stir until completely combined. Scoop the mixture onto a large baking sheet lined with foil and coated with nonstick spray. Spread the pecans to an even single layer. Bake until pecans are lightly toasted and browned, stirring every 10 minutes, about 20 to 25 minutes total. Remove from the oven and scoop the hot pecans onto wax or parchment paper to cool completely.

Apple Salsa

Apple Salsa

Apple Salsa

 

2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and finely chopped

1 can (4 ounces) chopped green chilies

¼ C. lemon juice

3 T. finely chopped fresh cilantro

1 clove garlic, minced

1 tsp. dried oregano leaves, crushed

½ tsp. salt

 

Combine apples, chilies, lemon juice, cilantro, garlic, oregano and salt in medium bowl; mix well.

 

Serve with Grilled Pork Tenderloin

DIY Worcestershire Sauce

DIY Worcestershire Sauce

DIY Worcestershire Sauce

Makes 3 – 4 cups

 

3 T. olive oil

2 large onions, chopped

2 serrano chiles, chopped with seeds (I added 2 jalapenos, as well)

2 T. minced garlic

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Two 2-ounce cans anchovies, drained (I usually add the oil)

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1 T. kosher salt

1 lemon, peel and white pith removed and discarded (I zest it first and freeze the zest)

2 C. honey (original recipe calls for dark corn syrup)

1 C. molasses

1 quart distilled white vinegar

1/4 pound fresh horseradish, peeled and grated

 

In a large, heavy sauce pan, combine the oil, onions and chiles and stir over high heat until soft, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, pepper, anchovies, cloves, salt, lemon, honey, molasses, vinegar, horseradish and 2 C. of water and bring it all to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the sauce reduces and thickens and barely coats a wooden spoon, about 6 hours. Your kitchen will smell heavenly! Strain the sauce through a fine-mesh sieve set over a bowl. Press gently to release all the liquid. Discard the solids and let the sauce cool to room temperature. Store in a bottle or jar in the fridge. It keeps indefinitely, but you’ll be gobbling it up!

Roasted Garlic Jelly

Roasted Garlic Jelly

Roasted Garlic Jelly

3 medium heads garlic

1 T. olive oil, divided

1 T. balsamic vinegar, divided

1 C. dry white wine

2/3 C. water

1/2 C. white balsamic vinegar

1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns, crushed

3 T. lemon juice

3 C. granulated sugar

2 (3oz) pouches liquid pectin

 

Using a sharp knife, cut off tops of garlic heads, exposing cloves. Place each head on a small square of aluminum foil set on a baking sheet. Top each head with 1 teaspoon olive oil and 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar. Scrunch foil loosely around garlic heads and roast in preheated oven until garlic is golden and very soft, 45 to 60 minutes. Let stand until cool enough to handle. Separate cloves, pinching each one to extract the soft roasted garlic. Discard skins. In a medium stainless steel saucepan, combine roasted garlic, wine, water, white balsamic vinegar and peppercorns. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and boil gently for 5 minutes. Cover, remove from heat and let steep for 15 minutes. Transfer garlic mixture to a strainer lined with several layers of dampened cheesecloth or a dampened coffee filter set over a deep bowl. Let drip, undisturbed, for about 30 minutes. Measure 1 2/3 C. garlic juice. If you do not have the required amount, add up to 1/4 C. dry white wine or water. (This step can be done up to one day in advance. Cover and refrigerate juice until ready to use). Meanwhile, prepare canner, jars, and lids. Transfer garlic juice to a large, deep stainless steel saucepan. Stir in lemon juice and sugar. Over high heat, stirring constantly, bring to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down. Stir in pectin. Return to a boil and boil hard, stirring constantly, for 1 minute. Remove from heat and quickly skim off foam. Quickly pour hot jelly into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar. Screw band down until resistance is met, then increase to fingertip tight. Place jars in canner, ensuring they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil and process for 10 minutes. Remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then remove jars, cool, and store.

Balsamic Pickled Shallots or Onions

Balsamic Pickled Shallots or Onions

Balsamic Pickled Shallots

3 – 3 ½ lb. small shallots

2 ½ C. distilled vinegar

1 ½ C. balsamic vinegar

2/3 C. golden caster sugar

1 T. salt

1 tsp. pickling spice

1 tsp. of cinnamon

2T. of salt for the brine

Boiling water enough to cover the shallots

 

Tip the shallots into a large bowl and pour over a kettleful of boiling water with the salt to cover and leave overnight.  The following day, drain and peel the shallots. Set the peeled shallots aside and place all the other ingredients into a large saucepan. Bring to the boil, lower the heat, then simmer for 3 mins. Drop the shallots into the pan and simmer for 10 mins until just tender. Remove the shallots with a slotted spoon and place in sterilized jars. Then pour the vinegar over to cover the shallots. Seal the jars and leave for at least 3 days. Ideally these shallots are best when left over time.

Kumquats in Syrup

Kumquats in Syrup

Kumquats in Syrup

4 to 5 C. whole kumquat fruits (about 65 kumquats)

1 1/2 C. sugar

3/4 C. water

1 cinnamon stick

2 whole cardamom pods

1 whole clove

 

Gather the ingredients. Wash the kumquat fruits. Use a paring knife to slice a thin sliver off of the stem end of each fruit (that’s the end with the whitish round dent). Pierce each kumquat twice with a toothpick. Put the prepared kumquats into a pot and add just enough water to cover them. Bring the kumquats and water to a boil over high heat. Boil for 2 minutes. Drain in a colander. Return the kumquats to the pot and again cover them with water. Once again place the pot over high heat and boil the fruit for 2 minutes before draining. Repeat the whole procedure for a total of three 2-minute boils. After the kumquats have drained in the colander for the third time, return them to the pot. Add the sugar, water, cinnamon stick, cardamom pods, and clove. Cook over medium heat, stirring ​constantly until the sugar has completely dissolved. Raise the heat to high and bring the ingredients to a full boil. Reduce the heat so that the mixture is gently simmering and cook for 30 minutes more. There should be bubbles steadily rising to the surface of the liquid, but the fruits should not be vigorously bouncing into each other. Remove the pot from the heat. Spoon the kumquats into clean canning jars (it is not necessary to sterilize the jars for this recipe because they will be processed for a full 10 minutes). Leave 1 inch of headspace. Once you’ve transferred all of the fruit to the jars, spoon the syrup from the pot over the fruit. The kumquats should be completely covered by the syrup, but there should still be at least half an inch of headspace between the surface of the food and the rims of the jars. Wipe the rims of the jars clean with a moist cloth or paper towel. Screw on the canning lids and process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Enjoy!