Browsed by
Tag: Jams+

Bacon Jam

Bacon Jam

Bacon Jam

 

1 lb. bacon

1 cup onion, chopped

1 cup dark corn syrup or sorghum

1 1/2 cup dark brown sugar

1/4 cup bourbon

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

1  tablespoon coarse black pepper

 

For Serving:

8 ounces mascarpone cheese

1 tablespoon tarragon, finely chopped

 

In a large pan or skillet, combine bacon and onion over medium-high heat. Cook until bacon is brown/crispy and onions are translucent, about 8-12 minutes. Add a couple tablespoons of bourbon to the pan and stir, scraping up the bits of bacon from the bottom of the pan. Reduce heat to low. In a medium bowl, combine all remaining ingredients. Stir well to combine. Transfer contents to the bacon mixture in the pan. Bring to a low simmer and cook until jam thickens, stirring frequently, 5-8 minutes. Thickness can be determined by observing drips from the stirring spoon. Remove from heat and serve hot. Whip together mascarpone cheese with tarragon. Spread onto the baguette or biscuit before topping with bacon jam.

Basic Herbal Jelly

Basic Herbal Jelly

Basic Herbal Jelly

1 C. of apple juice

2 C. of herbal infusion

2 tsp. lemon juice

4 C. sugar

1 package pectin

6 fresh sprigs of herbs for the jars

Proceed with the jelly directions on the box of pectin. Place a fresh herb sprig or flower into each jar.

Infusion:  To make an infusion, simply bring 2 C. of water to a boil, and take off the heat. Add a generous handful of herbs to the pan, put on the cover, and let cool to room temperature. Strain off the herbs and measure out 2 C.

Basil (sweet) – basil and water infusion (add 2 T. cloves for spicy flavor), strain.

Cinnamon/cherry juice (make infusion with ¼ C. crushed cinnamon), strain.

Clove/tangerine juice (make infusion with ¼ C. crushed cloves), strain.

Fennel – fennel and water infusion, add vinegar for all or part of the lemon juice.

Lemon balm with red grape juice.

Lemon thyme with white grape juice.

Lemon verbena and lemonade.

Marjoram and grapefruit juice.

Mint with water or apple juice.

Parsley with water or dry white wine.

Sage with cider or apple juice.

Savory and cranberry juice.

Scented geranium with water or apple juice.

Sweet woodruff and white wine.

Tarragon and white wine or with water (add vinegar).

Thyme and purple grape juice.

Peach Jam with Lemon Thyme and Almonds

Peach Jam with Lemon Thyme and Almonds

Peach Jam with Lemon Thyme and Almonds

 

Makes 4-5 half-pints

1/2 C. slivered almonds

12 ounces Granny Smith apples (about 2 large)

4 pounds peaches, peeled, pitted and diced

11/2 C. granulated sugar

3 T. strained fresh lemon juice

2 tsp. fresh lemon thyme leaves (or 1 tsp. regular thyme)

 

Sterilize jars by boiling for 10 minutes in a large canning pot; leave them in the pot to stay hot. Put a small plate in the freezer. Put the flat lids in a heatproof bowl. Toast almonds in a small skillet over medium-high heat, stirring constantly until fragrant and light brown, about 3 minutes. Remove to a plate and set aside. Quarter and core the apples, reserving the cores and seeds. Tie apple trimmings in cheesecloth (or a jelly bag, if you have one). Put the peaches and sugar in a wide, 6- to 8-quart preserving pan or other wide, shallow pan. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring frequently, and continue to cook until the juices just cover the peaches, about 5 minutes. Pour into a colander set over a large bowl. Stir peaches gently to drain off juice. Return juice to pan, along with the apples and the trimmings. Bring to a boil over high heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until syrup is thick and reduced, about 15 minutes. Return peaches and any accumulated juices to pan. Add lemon juice, almonds and lemon thyme. Bring back to simmer and cook, stirring frequently, about 15 minutes, until peaches are very tender and a small dab of jam spooned onto the chilled plate and returned to the freezer for a minute becomes somewhat firm. (It will not gel.) Remove from heat. Discard apples and trimmings, and stir gently to distribute fruit in the liquid.. Ladle hot jam into the jars, leaving 1/4-inch space at the top. Wipe jar rims. Put a flat lid and ring on each jar, and tighten until snug. Return the jars to the canning pot, making sure water covers jars by at least 1 inch. Bring to a boil and boil for 5 minutes. Remove from pot and let sit untouched for 12 hours. (After 1 hour, check to see if the jars have sealed. If the center of the lid can be pushed down, it hasn’t sealed. Store any unsealed jars in the refrigerator.) Label and store, preferably in a cool, dark place.

Hawaiian Jam

Hawaiian Jam

Hawaiian Jam

8 Peaches, peeled
3 lg Oranges
Pulp of 1 med. cantaloupe
1 Lemon
1 (8 1/2 oz.) can crushed Pineapple
Sugar

Chop all ingredients fine. Put oranges through food processor. Combine all with 3/4 cup sugar for every 1 cup of fruit. Mix well and let stand overnight. Next morning, gently cook mixture 1 hour, stirring frequently. Pour into hot jars and seal. Makes 8 pints.

Pineapple and Peach Jam with Mint

Pineapple and Peach Jam with Mint

Makes 8 half pints

1 and a half pineapples (about 6 C.), washed, peeled, eyes removed, quartered, and cored.
Chop into small pieces.
6 C. peaches, peeled, pitted, and chop into pieces
2 C. sugar
4 T. lemon juice
1 1/2 T. minced fresh mint

Put pineapple, peaches, and sugar into a pot and bring to a simmer, stirring frequently, until the juices are just starting to cover the fruit. Pour the mixture into a colander or mesh strainer and set it over a large bowl, stirring the fruit around to extract as much liquid as you can. Return that juice to the pan and bring to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally, until the syrup is thick and reduced, about 10 minutes. Return your fruit along with any excess juices that may have accumulated to the pot, along with 4 T. lemon juice and bring to a simmer. Simmer, stirring frequently, until the fruit is very tender, about 15 minutes. Once it reaches the desired consistency (to a jam consistency, this jam will not gel), remove from the heat and stir in your 1 – 2 T. mint. Ladle into your jars to 1/4 inch headspace, remove air bubbles, wipe rims, and assemble lids. Process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes

Old Fashioned Raspberry Preserves

Old Fashioned Raspberry Preserves

4 C. smashed, fresh raspberries , use a potato masher to smash the raspberries
4 C. sugar
¼ C. fresh lemon juice

Place berries in a large stainless steel or enamel saucepan. Bring to a full boil over high heat, stirring continuously. Boil hard for 1 minute, continuing to stir. Add sugar, return to a boil, and boil until mixture reaches 220ËšF on a candy or instant thermometer. Ladle into clean jars for storage in the freezer or into sterilized jars if processing with a water bath. If water-bath processed, this jam can be stored at room temperature.

Classic Peach Jam with Apple Pectin

Classic Peach Jam with Apple Pectin

12 oz. Granny Smith apples (about 2 large)
4 pounds peaches, peeled, pitted and diced (about 6 C.)
2 C. granulated sugar
3 T. strained fresh lemon juice

Sterilize jars by boiling for 10 minutes in a large canning pot; leave them in the pot to stay hot. Put a small plate in the freezer. Put the flat lids in a heat-proof bowl. Quarter and core the apples, reserving the cores and seeds. Tie cores and seeds in a cheesecloth bag and set aside. Put the peaches and sugar in a wide, 6- to 8-quart preserving pan or other wide shallow pan. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring frequently, and continue to cook until the juices just cover the peaches, about five minutes. Pour into a colander set over a large bowl. Stir peaches gently to drain off juice. Return juice to pan, along with the apples and the cheesecloth bag. Bring to a boil over high heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until syrup is thick and reduced, about 15 minutes.

Return peaches and any accumulated juices to pan, along with the lemon juice. Bring back to a simmer and cook, stirring frequently, about 15 minutes, until peaches are very tender and a small dab of jam spooned onto the chilled plate and returned to the freezer for a minute becomes somewhat firm. (It will not gel.) Remove from heat. Remove apples and trimmings, and stir gently to distribute fruit in the liquid. Ladle hot water from the canning pot into the bowl with lids, and remove jars from hot water bath.

Ladle hot jam into the jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space at the top. Wipe jar rims with wet paper towel, if necessary. Put a flat lid and ring on each jar, and tighten until snug. Return the jars to the canning pot, making sure water covers jars by at least 1 inch. Bring to a rolling boil and boil for five minutes. Remove jars from the pot and let sit untouched for 12 hours. (After one hour, check to see if the jars have sealed. If the center of the lid can be pushed down, it hasn’t sealed. Immediately move any unsealed jars to the refrigerator. They should keep for a couple of weeks.) When you’re all done, label your pretty little jars and store them in a cool, dark place.

Blueberry Preserves (No Pectin)

Blueberry Preserves (No Pectin)

10 C. fresh blueberries
6 C. granulated sugar
¼ tsp. salt
2 T. lemon zest
â…“ C. fresh lemon juice

This is a canned preserve, so it’s important to make sure your jars and lids are sterilized. If you plan to freeze yours, then you can skip over this first part. To begin, fill a large stockpot half full of water [you are going to want the water to be over the tops of your jars by a couple inches, so make sure you have enough water in there for that] and set over a medium burner. Make sure the rack is in the bottom. Carefully put in the jars and lids. Once this comes up to a boil, cover and turn off heat. You are going to turn it back on high for about the last 10 minutes of the preserve cooking time, to sterilize the jars and have the water hot enough to can the final product. Wash blueberries and pick over, removing any debris and spoiled berries. Place about half of the berries in a 5 to 8 quart heavy pot. Crush well with a potato masher. Stir in the other half of the berries, the sugar, salt and lemon zest. Place the pot over a medium flame, and cover with a lid. Stir every few minutes. Once the mixture comes up to a simmer or low boil, remove the lid, and continue to stir every 5 minutes, or more often if they start to stick at all. Place a small plate in the freezer – this will be to test the doneness of the preserves. Cook about 25 minutes, and test a small amount on the cold plate you put in the freezer. After sitting on the plate for a minute or so, the preserves should look pretty thick, and should not run very freely if you tip the plate. If the mixture is still too thin, keep cooking, and check again about every 5 minutes, returning the plate to the freezer after each check. How long it takes is going to depend largely on the moisture content of the berries you are using. This batch took about 40 minutes total. At the 30 minute mark, return your large pot of water and jars to a boil. When the preserves are thick enough, stir in the lemon juice and cook an additional 5 minutes. Carefully remove the jars from the boiling water in the large pot, and set upright on a towel on your work surface. Keep the heat on under the pot. Ladle the preserves into the jars – the big funnel in the canning tools set helps keep the edges of the jars clean. Jams don’t need very much headspace above the surface of the jam itself – about ¼ inch between the top of the jam and the rim of the jar is enough room. Any more than that leaves too much chance for bacteria to grow, so fill them right up to that level. Wipe the edges of the jars clean with a damp cloth, and put on the lids and rings. Don’t screw the rings down super tight – just until they resist a bit is fine. If you have less than enough to fill the final jar, just put that one in the fridge to eat up first. Carefully place the covered jars back in the large pot of water – there are jar tongs in the set of tools, or use regular tongs to gently set the jars upright on the bottom. Once the water is back up to a full boil, set the timer for 10 minutes. When the time is up, carefully remove the jars to a wooden cutting board, or a dry towel on the counter – don’t use same towel as before since it might be damp and cooler and could break the hot jars. You will probably start to hear the centers of the lids popping down pretty quickly. Cool completely and check to make sure all of the centers of the lids have popped down. Refrigerate any jars with a dome still on the lid, and eat up first. When the jars are fully cool, you can remove the rings if you like, though I leave them on. Store in a fairly cool spot, and when opening the jars, inspect the contents, discarding any jars with mold or questionable appearance. Preserves will keep very well for up a year, or even longer, though the quality may suffer somewhat after a year.

Raspberry Preserves (No Pectin)

Raspberry Preserves (No Pectin)

2 & ½ lbs of fresh raspberries
3 & ¾ C. granulated sugar
¼ tsp. kosher salt
juice of 1 lemon

You can freeze these preserves, and they will keep in the fridge for quite awhile, but if you plan to can them, get your canner ready, as well as your jars and lids. This will make around 5 or 6 half pint jars of preserves, so submerge the washed, empty jars in the canner, and boil them for at least 10 minutes. It’s a good idea to have the lids and rings in another smaller pan of boiling water, so that they don’t get knocked around by the jars. [I will put some links after the recipe, so you can find canning supplies. Pick over the berries, and pick out any squishy, overripe berries. Wash the berries and allow to drain for a few minutes. Place all the berries, the sugar and salt in a large, heavy bottomed pot. I have an old Revere Ware stockpot that holds 5 quarts that is perfect for a batch this size. You want to allow enough room for the mixture to boil – it will foam up a bit. Mash the berries somewhat with a potato masher or large spoon, and turn on the heat. Stir as the mixture begins to come up to a boil, to help the sugar get all mixed in and dissolved. Once it is at a hard boil – which means the boil can’t be “stirred down”, back off the heat just a very little bit. You can, if you like, remove some of the seeds at this point. I put about 4 C. the mixture into a wire strainer, over a bowl, and use a ladle or big spoon to push the preserves through, while keeping the seeds in the strainer. Keep at it until you have as much of the preserves through the strainer as is possible. Discard the seeds. Put a small plate in the freezer, for testing the preserves. You need to stir the boiling mixture often, to keep it from sticking and scorching which can ruin the whole batch. [if it does stick and burn, don’t stir or scrape the burned part from the bottom – pour the preserve mixture into another pan, and just leave the burned part in the first pan – you can then cook it down the rest of the way, and then taste it to if it’s okay.] The closer it is to being done, the more you need to stir, because you are boiling away the moisture in the mixture, and it will get thicker and more liable to stick as that process goes on. After about 20 minutes, you can check with an instant read thermometer – you are looking for a temperature of around 210º to 215º . It usually takes around 25 to 30 minutes at a full boil. If your thermometer reads 210º, try the plate test: take the plate out of the freezer and test a dab of the jam – if it sets up, and seems like a good consistency then it’s done. Stir in the lemon juice, and cook another 2 minutes. One at a time, fill the jars by removing each one from the pot of boiling water, fill carefully, leaving ½ inch of headspace. Wipe the jar rim clean with a clean towel that has been dipped in the boiling water in the canner – be careful not to burn your fingers. Place the jar lid and ring on the jar, turning the ring to snug the lid down. Don’t over tighten. Place the filled jars back into the canner, and cover it. The jars should be covered by an inch of water. Bring back up to a full rolling boils, and process for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat, and leave the jars in the covered canner for 5 minutes – no more or water may suction into the jars as they cool. Remove jars and allow to sit undisturbed for 24 hours. Store at normal room temperature for up to one year – refrigerate after opening.

Peach and Lemon Thyme Freezer Jam

Peach and Lemon Thyme Freezer Jam

4 C. peeled, chopped, and/or mashed peaches
1/4 C. lemon juice
1/2 C. honey
1 T. lemon thyme leaves, minced
4 1/2 T. pectin powder plus 3 T. calcium water (from a Pomona low-sugar pectin box)

To easily peel peaches: Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Slice an “X” just through the skin on the bottom of each peach. Using a slotted spoon, lower the peaches into the water. Boil for 1-2 minutes, remove with the slotted spoon, and immediately plunge into a bowl of ice water. The peels should slip off easily. Add the calcium water to a medium saucepan. Pour honey into a separate bowl. Mix the pectin powder into the honey. Add the peaches, lemon juice, and thyme to the calcium water. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Add pectin-honey mixture and stir vigorously for 1-2 minutes. Return to a boil and remove from heat. Fill jars or containers to 1/4 inch from top. Allow to cool to room temperature. Place jars in freezer without lids and freeze overnight or until firm. Place lids on jars. To use, thaw jam in refrigerator overnight. Should be used within 2 weeks once opened.

Heavenly Jam – Peach, Pear, Apple & Ginger

Heavenly Jam – Peach, Pear, Apple & Ginger

12 peaches, peeled and pitted (8 C. macerated)
12 apples, peeled and cored (8 C. macerated)
12 pears, peeled and cored (8 C. macerated)
24 C. sugar (1 C. sugar for each C. fruit)
Fresh ginger- a knob the size of your thumb, grated
.
First, you will want to clean out your mason jars. There are several methods for doing this (I have added some helpful links above) but I like to take a short cut and run them through the dishwasher on the ultra-hot ‘sanitation’ setting, which also heat dries the jars. Do ensure your jars are dry before canning with them. To peel the peaches, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Slice a small ‘X’ into the skin on the bottom of each peach. Place the scored peaches into boiling water for 30-40 seconds then shock them in a bath of very cold or ice water. The skins should peel off quickly and easily. Quarter the fruits, remove the pits and whiz them through the food processor. You should have roughly 8 C. macerated fruit. Pour chopped peaches into your large jam pot. Peel apples and pears with a vegetable peeler. Quarter and core fruits and blitz through a food processor in batches, similar to how you cut the peaches- small chunks are okay but try and get any larger pieces broken up. You should have roughly 8 C. chopped pear and 8 C. chopped apple. Add both to the jam pot. Add 24 C. sugar (1 C. for each C. fruit) and grated ginger and stir well. On the stovetop, turn the heat on the jam pot up to high, stirring frequently to ensure the bottom doesn’t burn. Once the fruit has come to a boil, turn the heat down to med-low and simmer for 40 minutes or so. Using a spoon and a little bowl, skim the ‘foam’ that forms on the top of the jam as it is simmering. This ‘jam waste’ is cloudy but still delicious and is a great way to test for flavor and adjust the ginger to your palette! When the jam is ready, the color will have darkened slightly to a beautiful gold and the bubbles coming to the surface with ‘burp’ slowly, indicating a good thickness. Fill a small saucepan with water and bring the water to a boil. Place the center lids of your mason jars (with the rubber seal) in the boiling water to sanitize them. Using a ladle and a wide funnel, pour your jam into one of the sanitized mason jars. Using a moist cloth, wipe down the edge of the jar to ensure a tight seal. Using tongs, lift one of the mason jar lids out of the boiling water and place on top of the filled jar. Screw on the outer lid tightly and set aside. Repeat with the rest of the jars until all the jam has been canned. As you go through this process you will begin to hear a satisfying ‘popping’ noise as the hot jars seal themselves- that’s a good thing! A ‘pop’ means the jar is well sealed and the jam will keep well in a cool dark place for up to a year or two!

Balsamic Tomato Jam with Fresh Basil

Balsamic Tomato Jam with Fresh Basil

3 1/2 lbs tomatoes, coarsely chopped
3/4 C. brown sugar
1/2 C. balsamic vinegar
1/4 C. bottled lemon juice
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. coriander
1/4 tsp. cumin
1 T. red pepper flakes
1/2 C. chopped fresh basil
1 tsp. sugar
2 tsp. pectin

Mix tomatoes, brown sugar, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, salt, coriander, cumin and red pepper flakes in a 3 1/2 quart dutch oven. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer and cook until reduced by half, about 30 minutes. Stir in basil. Continue to cook until reduces slightly, about 30 minutes longer. Puree with immersion blender until smooth. In a small bowl mix sugar and pectin. Bring jam to a rapid boil, add pectin and stir until dissolved. Continue boiling jam for 2-3 minutes until reaches jelly point. Ladle jam into hot, sterile half-pint or 4oz. jars leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Process jars in a boiling water bath for 25 min.

Honey Lemon Balm Jelly

Honey Lemon Balm Jelly

3 C. (packed) fresh lemon balm leaves
6 C. water
1 1/2 – 3 C. local honey (choose amount that suits your tastes)
juice and zest of 2 lemons
8 tsp. Pomona’s Pectin powder
8 tsp. calcium water (made using calcium powder that comes with Pomona’s Pectin, instructions included in package)

In very hot water, wash and rinse 8 half pint canning jars. This can be done by hand or in the dishwasher. Do this right before ready to use so jars are still hot. Add lids and rings to a large pot and cover with water. Bring to a strong simmer but do not boil. Keep lids and rings in hot water as you prepare jam. Bring the water to a boil in a saucepan and stir in the lemon balm . Remove from heat, cover, and let the mixture steep for 20 minutes. Strain the “tea” squeezing the leaves to remove all the liquid. Stir in the fresh lemon juice, zest and calcium water. You should have very close to 6 C. liquid after the lemon juice is added. If you don’t, add enough water to make 6 C. Measure honey and pectin into a separate bowl, stir thoroughly (you can start with less honey and add more later). In a saucepan over the highest possible heat, bring the “tea” mixture to a boil then add the honey/pectin mixture. Check (taste) to see at this time if you would like to add more honey. Bring mixture back up to a hard rolling boil, time it for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Now it is time to transfer the jelly to jars. Using a sterilized wide mouth funnel and small measuring C. as a scoop, fill hot/clean jars leaving 1/4″ head space at the top. Place lids on the top and screw on bands, not too tightly. Process jars in boiling water for 10 minutes. (Add one minute more for every 1,000 feet of elevation.) Using a jar lifter, remove from water once processed. Allow to sit in one spot and cool completely. Add to your pantry!

Blackberry Jam with Lemon Zest

Blackberry Jam with Lemon Zest

1 pound Granny Smith apples (about 3 small apples)
3 pounds blackberries (about 8 C.), rinsed
2 C. granulated sugar
3 T. strained fresh lemon juice
Grated zest of 2 small lemons

Sterilize jars and lids. Put a plate in the freezer. Quarter and core the apples, reserving the cores and seeds. Tie apple trimmings in cheesecloth. Put blackberries and sugar in a wide, 6- to 8-quart preserving pan or other wide, shallow pan. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring frequently, and cook until the juices just cover the blackberries, about 5 minutes. Pour into a colander set over a large bowl. Stir berries gently to drain off juice. Return juice to pan, along with the apples and the trimmings. Bring to a boil over high heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until the thickened mixture measures 220 degrees on a candy thermometer, 15 to 20 minutes. Return berries and any juice to pan. Add lemon juice and zest, and bring to simmer. Cook, stirring frequently, about 15 minutes, until a small dab of jam spooned onto the chilled plate and returned to the freezer for a minute wrinkles when you nudge it. Off the heat, discard apples and trimmings. Ladle hot jam into jars, leaving 1/4-inch space at the top. Wipe rims, cover with lids and rings, and tighten until snug. Return jars to canning pot, making sure water covers jars by at least 1 inch. Bring to a boil and boil for 5 minutes. Remove from pot and let jars sit untouched for 12 hours. (After 1 hour, check to see if jars have sealed. Store any unsealed jars in the refrigerator.) Label and store in a cool, dark place.

Cranberry Marmalade

Cranberry Marmalade

1 C. orange juice
3 C. fresh cranberries
1 orange, seeded and finely chopped
1 tart apple, cored and minced
12 dried apricots, chopped
1 1/4 C. honey
1/2 tsp. ground cardamom

Combine the orange juice, cranberries and chopped orange in a large, non-reactive pot. Bring to a simmer and let cook until the cranberries begin to burst. Add the apple, apricots, honey and cardamom and cook for approximately 20 minutes, until the orange rinds are tender and it has thickened (watch it carefully, honey scorches easily. I speak from experience here). Once it has reached a consistency you like, remove it from the heat. Should you want to can it, pour chutney into prepared jars. Remove air bubbles, wipe the rims and apply lids/bands. Process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes (don’t start your timer until the water has returned to a boil). For an even more shelf stable product, replace 3/4 of a C. the honey with one cup unprocessed cane sugar (honey is sweeter than sugar, so you need a bit more to make up the difference).

Wild Leek Marmalade

Wild Leek Marmalade

A delicious accompaniment to roasted or grilled meats, poultry and game, this sweet/sour/savory condiment is also great with sandwiches and cheese. So who cares whether it’s called a jam, relish, marmalade or chutney – point is, it’s delicious!

wild-leek-marmalade2 lb. wild leek bulbs, fresh or thawed frozen
2 T. unsalted butter
1 cup dry sherry
2 cups dark brown sugar
2 cups cider vinegar
2 tsp. mustard powder
2 T. yellow mustard seed
2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. freshly ground pepper

Slice the wild leek bulbs crosswise into 1/4 inch long pieces. Melt the butter in a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Add the sliced ramp bulbs and cook, stirring occasionally, until they soften and become a light golden brown. This should take about 15 minutes. Add the sherry and continue to cook until the sherry is reduced by half. Add the rest of the ingredients and raise the heat to medium-high. When the mixture comes to a low boil, reduce the heat slightly and continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 40 minutes. Reduce the heat further, if necessary, to make sure that the bottom does not burn.When the mixture has become thick and bubbly, remove from the heat and allow to cool. Place the wild leek marmalade in a container with a tightly fitting lid and refrigerate for up to a month. Serve with roasted meats and poultry, on sandwiches and with cheese – anywhere you want to add the sweet/sour tangy flavor of wild leeks!

Uses for Jams & Jellies

Uses for Jams & Jellies

To spruce up store-bought coleslaw, stir in some orange marmalade and toasted chopped almonds.

To balance the flavor of tomato sauce, stir in 1/4 C. grape jelly for every 4 C. homemade sauce. The sweetness of the jelly helps to balance the acidity of less-than-perfect tomatoes.

To make muffins with a surprise inside, spoon 2 tsp. muffin batter into each muffin cup. Make an indentation in the muffin batter with the back of a spoon and ladle in 1 tsp. jam, marmalade, or preserves. Spoon the remaining batter over the jam in each muffin C.. Bake as directed in the recipe.

To make overnight stuffed French toast, cut 1 loaf Italian bread crosswise into 8 to 10 slices that are each about 1 1/2 inches thick. Cut a slit through the top crust of each slice to form a deep pocket. In a medium bowl, mix together 1 package (8 oz.) cream cheese, 2 tsp. confectioners’ sugar, and 1/2 tsp. almond extract. Spread the cream cheese mixture equally inside the bread pockets, then spread 1/2 to 3/4 C. strawberry, raspberry or cherry preserves equally inside the pockets, opposite the cream cheese. Lay the stuffed bread in a single layer in a shallow 4-quart baking dish (roughly 15 x 10 inches). In a medium bowl, combine 5 eggs, 1 1/2 C. light cream or half-and-half, 1 tsp. vanilla extract, 1 tsp. confectioners’ sugar, and a pinch of salt. Pour evenly over the bread, tilting the pan and swirling the egg mixture to completely saturate the bread. Cover and chill in the refrigerator overnight. In the morning, bring the bread to room temperature, then cook in unsalted butter or oil on a griddle until golden brown on both sides, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Serve with maple syrup.

To make a quick glaze for baked or grilled chicken, mix together cherry preserves and fresh orange juice. Brush onto the chicken before baking or during the last 5 minutes of grilling to create a glaze.

For a quick carrot slaw with a twist, combine 3 C. pre-shredded carrots, 1/2 chopped red onion, 1/4 C. golden raisins, 1 tsp. orange marmalade, 1/4 C. olive oil, 3 tsp. capers, 3 tsp. red-wine vinegar, 1/4 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper.

For sweet and savory slow-cooked brisket, put a 3-pound brisket in a slow cooker, in one or two pieces. In a medium bowl, combine 1 C. ketchup, 1/4 C. grape jam, 1 envelope onion soup mix, and 1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper. Add the mixture to the slow cooker, making sure the meat is well-coated. Cover and cook on low until the meat is tender, 8 to 10 hours.

To thicken a vinaigrette, whisk in a few tsp. orange marmalade, apricot jam, or raspberry preserves.

For a quick filling for thumbprint cookies or nut rolls, mix together raspberry jam and almond extract.

To pull together a fresh strawberry dessert sauce, melt 2 tsp. strawberry preserves over medium heat. Add 2 tsp. brandy, a pinch of salt, and 1 pint sliced strawberries. Cook until the berries begin to fall apart. Cool, then serve the sauce over cake or ice cream.

For an easy cherry marinade for grilled chicken, combine:

1/4 C. cherry preserves
2 tsp. olive oil
6 oz. black cherry soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. fresh lemon juice
1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon

Add to the mixture 2 pounds of boneless, skinless chicken breasts or thighs and marinate in the refrigerator for 4 to 8 hours. Grill or broil the chicken, then bring the marinade to a boil in a saucepan. Add another 6 oz. black cherry soda, a drained can of dark sweet Bing cherries, and boil for 5 minutes. Dissolve 1 tsp. cornstarch in 1 tsp. cold water and stir into the marinade until thickened. Serve with the chicken. Some grated orange zest makes a nice touch.

For a wonderful sauce for salmon or chicken, mix 1 part blueberry or raspberry jam into 2 parts barbecue sauce. Spoon a layer of the sauce over the salmon or chicken and broil until finished. Spoon a little more sauce over the salmon or chicken before serving.

For a simply outstanding glaze for roasted or grilled leg of lamb, use red currant jelly mixed with fresh orange juice.

To stir up a quick glaze for barbecued ribs, combine 2/3 C. apricot preserves, 2 tsp. Dijon mustard, 1 tsp. toasted sesame oil, and 1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper in a saucepan. Simmer over low heat for 5 minutes, then brush onto the barbecued ribs during the last 10 minutes of cooking.

For an easy apple glaze for pork, combine 1/4 C. apple jelly, 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice, 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon, and 1/4 tsp. ground allspice. Place 1 pork tenderloin in a small roasting pan and brush with half of the apple-jelly mixture. Roast in a 375°F oven until the center registers 155°F on an instant-read thermometer and the juices run clear, about 25 minutes. Let stand for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, on a broiler pan, arrange 2 cored and thinly sliced red apples and brush with the remaining apple-jelly mixture. Broil 5 inches from the heat until the apple slices are tender, about 5 minutes. Serve with the sliced tenderloin.

To make an easy orange sauce for fruit desserts or cheesecake, boil 3 C. fresh orange juice until reduced to 1 1/2 C., then stir in 1/2 C. orange marmalade and 1/4 C. firmly packed brown sugar. Thicken with a mixture of 1 tsp. cornstarch dissolved in 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice.

To make upside-down muffins, spoon 1 1/2 tsp. your favorite jam or preserves into the bottom of each greased muffin C. in the pan. Top with your favorite muffin batter and bake as directed in the recipe. Run a knife around the sides and invert the muffins onto a rack to cool.

To make a glaze for Brie cheese, stir together 1/2 C. strawberry or cherry preserves, 1/2 tsp. grated lemon zest, and 1/4 tsp. almond extract. Spread over the wheel of Brie and bake at 350°F until the cheese just begins to melt, 12 to 15 minutes.

For a jump-start on cold strawberry soup, combine strawberry preserves and buttermilk as the base.

For a dessert of strawberries with warm rhubarb sauce, cook 1 pound frozen, cut-up rhubarb and 1/2 C. sugar in a saucepan over medium heat until the rhubarb is softened, about 10 minutes. Stir in 1 C. strawberry preserves. Serve warm over 1 1/2 pints sliced strawberries. Garnish with sour cream or whipped cream, if you like.

To doctor up plain yogurt, stir in strawberry, raspberry, or blueberry jam. It’s both cheaper and healthier than buying yogurt C. that are premixed with “fruit at the bottom.”

For an easy cake filling, mix 1/2 C. your favorite jam, jelly, or preserves with 1 tsp. brandy or liqueur and microwave until the mixture can be stirred smooth.

To quickly glaze a fruit tart or cheesecake and give it a pretty sheen, melt some red currant jelly in a microwavable bowl. Brush the melted jelly over the top of the fruit tart or cheesecake.
Uses for Ketchup

To make real Russian dressing, whisk together 1/4 C. mayonnaise, 1/4 C. sour cream, 2 tsp. ketchup, and 3 tsp. fresh lemon juice. Then, to be truly authentic, fold in 2 tsp. red or black caviar (remember— salmon eggs are very reasonably priced if you don’t want to splurge on the serious stuff).

For a basic sweet-and-sour stir-fry sauce, dissolve 1 tsp. cornstarch in 1 tsp. cold water in the bottom of a medium bowl. Stir in:

1/3 C. rice vinegar
1/2 tsp. finely chopped fresh ginger
3 tsp. ketchup
2 1/2 to 3 tsp. dark brown sugar
1/2 garlic clove, minced
1 tsp. rice wine or dry sherry

Add the sauce to the hot wok or skillet at the end of stir-frying and cook until thickened, about 1 minute. This sauce tastes great with chicken, pork, and seafood.

To make an easy braising liquid for beef brisket, mix 2 1/2 C. ketchup with 2 1/2 C. beef broth. Scatter 1/2 tsp. salt and 1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper over 2 to 3 pounds of beef brisket. Brown the brisket in a Dutch oven in 1 tsp. vegetable oil. Remove the brisket and sauté 2 large chopped onions in the pan. Add the ketchup mixture and simmer for 2 minutes. Add the brisket, cover, and simmer until the meat is fork-tender, about 2 hours. Skim the fat from the gravy, then slice the meat and serve with the gravy.

Sungold Tomato Preserves

Sungold Tomato Preserves

sungold4 pounds sungold tomatoes
3/4 cup lemon juice
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
3/4 cup brown sugar
2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons nutmeg

In a food processor or blender, blend the tomatoes until mostly smooth. Mix the tomato puree with the rest of the ingredients in a large stockpot. Heat over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and allow to simmer for about an hour, or until the preserves will mound on the back of a spoon without sliding off immediately. Use an immersion blender to smooth out the preserves.

Tip: If you don’t have an immersion blender, you can process the preserves in batches in a food processor or blender. Alternatively, don’t blend the preserves any further, and enjoy the more chunky preserves.

While the preserves cook, prepare for canning. Wash the jars and flat lids with hot, soapy water. Put the jars in the canning pot and fill the pot with hot water. Heat over medium-high heat to keep the jars hot. Place the lids in a heat-proof bowl.

When the preserves are almost done, move some of the boiling water from the canning pot into the heat-proof bowl containing the lids. Line the hot jars up on a folded towel, then pour the water out of the heat-proof bowl and off the lids.

Fill the jars with preserves up to ¼” below the rim. Use a clean towel to wipe any preserves off the rims, then top each jar with a lid and a tightened ring. Place the jars back in the canning pot and make sure they are covered by at least 1 inch of water. Bring to a boil and process for 15 minutes. Place the jars on a folded towel and allow to sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours. Check the seals of the lids after 1 hour. If a seal has not formed, refrigerate the jar immediately.

Try making a grilled cheese and tomato preserves sandwich.

Bourbon Peach & Thyme Jam

Bourbon Peach & Thyme Jam

3 large fresh peaches, peeled
3 T. granulated sugar
Juice from 1/2 lemon
2 T. bourbon
1/2 tsp. minced fresh thyme, lightly packed

Using a sharp knife, cut peaches into 1/2-inch segments. In a large saucepan, place peaches, sugar, lemon juice, bourbon, and thyme. Bring to a boil over medium high heat and reduce the heat to bring the jam to a simmer. Continue simmering, stirring occasionally, until jam thickens to desired consistency (about 20-30 minutes). If the peaches are too large for your tastes, mash them a bit with a fork to smooth out the jam. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. Serve on bread, scones, biscuits, or as an ice cream topping.

Sun-Dried Tomato Onion Jam

Sun-Dried Tomato Onion Jam

1094673 medium onions, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced crosswise
3 T. unsalted butter
1/3 C. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. black pepper
1/8 tsp. dried hot red pepper flakes
1/2 C. dry white wine
1 T. red-wine vinegar
1/4 C. packed dried apricots, thinly sliced
3/4 C. drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, chopped

Cook onions, butter, sugar, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes, covered, in a 10-inch heavy skillet over low heat, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft and pale golden, about 30 minutes. Add wine, vinegar, apricots, and tomatoes and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until thick, 20 to 30 minutes. Serve at room temperature. Makes about 2 cups.

Fig Preserves with Root 80 Proof Spirits

Fig Preserves with Root 80 Proof Spirits

8 cups fresh figsfigpreserves1edited
3 cups water
1 tablespoon baking soda
1 1/2 cups sugar
Zest 1 lemon
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup ROOT 80 Proof Spirits (optional)

Put figs in a large bowl, mix 2 cups water with baking soda in a large measuring cup. Pour soda water mixture over figs, press figs into water to remove debris then rinse with cold water. Cut figs into small pieces. In a large stockpot add figs, sugar, lemon zest, lemon juice, and 1 cup remaining water. Cook over medium high heat for 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove pot from heat, puree mixture with an immersion blender until smooth. Return to heat, bring to a boil and cook for 10 minutes. Remove pot from heat and process hot mixture again with immersion blender until thick and creamy (resembles very thick applesauce). Add 1/2 cup ROOT 80 Proof Spirits, stir to blend. Return to heat and cook additional 10 minutes, stirring constantly. Ladle hot preserves into sterilized jars, cover jars with cleaned lids and rims, process in a hot water bath for 15 minutes. Allow preserves to cool, store in a dry dark place.

Watermelon Jelly

Watermelon Jelly

03e9c685b9da28696767e63a9cc092c62 cups watermelon juice (from about 1 small or 1/2 large watermelon)
3 tablespoons fresh or bottle lemon juice
3 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 pouch Certo liquid pectin

To make watermelon juice, roughly chop watermelon. You’ll need about 6 cups of chopped melon to produce about two cups of juice. Run melon through a food mill (if you have one), or crush and then strain through a fine mesh sieve to remove any seeds or pulp. Prepare canner and wash/sterilize 8 4-ounce canning jars. Keep jars in hot (not boiling) water until ready to use. Combine watermelon juice, lemon juice, and sugar in a 6 to 8-quart nonreactive saucepan. Bring to a full roiling boil (a boil that doesn’t stop bubbling when stirred) over high heat, stirring constantly. Quickly stir in pectin. Return to a full rolling boil and boil exactly 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam with a metal spoon. Ladle hot jam into jars, leaving 1/4-inch of headspace. Wipe the rims clean and top with lid; screw on ring until finger tight. Process in a boiling water bath for 7 minutes. Remove from water and let cool completely, 12 to 24 hours. Check seals. Any unsealed jars should be refrigerated and used within 1 month. 6-7 4oz. Jars

Cranberry Compote

Cranberry Compote

orange-cranberry-compote_400x4001 (12-ounce) bag fresh cranberries
1 1/2 cups plus 2 T. water, divided
1/2 cup plus 2 T. sugar
1 tsp. orange zest
1/4 cup fresh orange juice
1 T. cornstarch

In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the cranberries, 1 1/2 cups water, sugar, orange zest, and orange juice. Cook until cranberry skins begin to split, about 5 to 10 minutes. Using a potato masher, crush cranberries until no whole berries remain. Reduce heat to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until thickened, 5 to 10 minutes. In a small bowl, combine remaining 2 T. water and cornstarch, and stir until smooth. Pour into the cranberry mixture and cook for 6 minutes. Remove from heat, and cool for 15 minutes before serving.

Cape Gooseberry-Rose Preserves

Cape Gooseberry-Rose Preserves

Cape Gooseberry-Rose Preserves

 

1 ¼ lb. Cape Gooseberries, husks and stems removed

1 ½ C. sugar

3 T. bottled Lemon Juice (fresh squeezed is not safe to use)

2 tsp. Rose Water

 

Place 2 small plates in freezer to chill. In large saucepan, bring gooseberries, sugar, and lemon juice to boil, stirring often, over medium-high heat. Once sugar has completely dissolved, remove pot from heat and crush fruit coarse with potato masher, leaving some berries intact. Return mixture to boil over medium-high heat and cook, stirring and adjusting heat as needed, until mixture registers 217 to 220 degrees, 12 to 15 minutes. (Temperature will be lower at higher elevations; click here for more information.) Remove pot from heat. To test consistency, place 1 tsp. preserves on chilled plate and freeze for 2 minutes. Drag your finger through preserves on plate; preserves have correct consistency when your finger leaves distinct trail. If runny, return pot to heat and simmer for 1 to 3 minutes longer before retesting. Skim any foam from surface of preserves using spoon and stir in rose water. Meanwhile, place two 1-C. jars in bowl and place under hot running water until heated through, 1 to 2 minutes; shake dry. 5. Using funnel and ladle, portion hot preserves into hot jars. Let cool to room temperature, cover, and refrigerate until preserves are set, 12 to 24 hours. (Preserves can be refrigerated for up to 2 months.) You may can for long term storage as well.

Easy Cape Gooseberries Preserves

Easy Cape Gooseberries Preserves

Easy Cape Gooseberries Preserves

 

4 C. cape gooseberries, husked

1 lemon, juice and zest

1 1/2 C. sugar

Instructions

 

Combine the cape gooseberries, juice and zest of one lemon, and sugar in a heavy-bottomed sauce pan over medium heat. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally, and reduce heat to maintain a simmer for 30 to 40 minutes. You can mash the gooseberries toward the end if you want a smoother jam, but I love the textural quality of leaving some of the fruit whole. Pour the preserves into sterilized canning jars. Seal the jars, then submerge them in a pot of water and boil for 5 minutes. Carefully remove the jars and let cool. Check the lids to make sure they’ve fully sealed; refrigerate any jars with imperfect seals. The jam will keep in the fridge for several months, so you can skip the canning process and simply refrigerate your final product after it’s cooled to room temperature.

Melon Jam with Lime and Vanilla

Melon Jam with Lime and Vanilla

Melon Jam with Lime and Vanilla

 

For 3 jars

2 large Melon

1 lime

1 Vanilla pod

750 g Sugar in pieces

 

Cut the melons in half. Remove the glitches. Take the flesh. Weigh it: you have to get 1 kg. Bring 15 cl of water with the sugar to a boil in a jam bowl (or in a casserole). Add melon, grated zest and lime juice and split vanilla bean. Cook for about 50 minutes over low heat, turning often. Check the cooking: a few drops poured on a cold plate flow slowly (this jam is always a little liquid). Skim and put in jars. Close and turn the jars over on their lids until cooled.

Roasted Pepper, Tomato, and Preserved Lemon Relish

Roasted Pepper, Tomato, and Preserved Lemon Relish

2 red bell peppers, roasted, peeled, and seeded
1/4 tsp. salt
2 tsp. diced salted lemon rind
1 tomato, peeled, seeded, and diced
1 tsp. balsamic or rice vinegar
1 garlic clove, minced
1/4 C. olive oil
1 baguette bread, sliced

Finely dice roasted peppers. Combine with the salt, salted lemon rind, tomato, and vinegar. Set aside. Turn oven on to broil. In a small bowl, combine the garlic and olive oil. Cut 12 slices of baguette on a diagonal. Paint each one with olive oil/garlic mixture. Place on a baking sheet. Broil until lightly browned, 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Let cool and top with tomato/bell pepper mixture. Serve immediately.

Rhubarb Conserve with Ginger and Lemon

Rhubarb Conserve with Ginger and Lemon

rubarb1 lb. rhubarb, diced (about 4 C. 1/2-inch slices)

2 to 3 medium lemons

3 C. granulated sugar

1/4 C. crystallized ginger, chopped

1/3 C. slivered almonds, toasted and coarsely chopped (see note)

 

Place rhubarb slices in a wide, heavy 5- or 6-quart saucepan. Zest the lemons to make 3 T.; add to the pot. Squeeze 2 lemons to make 6 T. juice; add to the pot. Mix in the sugar and ginger. Let the pot stand for 3 hours or until sugar is dissolved. Wash 3 half-pint jars and fill with hot water until needed. Prepare lids as manufacturer directs. Stir rhubarb mixture thoroughly, then place pot over medium-high heat and bring the mixture to a boil, stirring often. Cook 10 to 15 minutes, stirring often, until a thermometer reads 220 degrees or the mixture passes the cold saucer test (see note). Remove from heat and stir in the nuts. Drain the jars. Ladle hot jam into 1 hot jar at a time, leaving 1/4-inch head space. Wipe the jar rim with a clean, damp cloth. Attach the lid. Fill and close the remaining jars. Cool until the lids pop, a few hours, then refrigerate for up to 2 months, or freeze for 1 year. For longer storage, process in a boiling-water canner for 10 minutes (15 minutes at 1,000 to 6,000 feet; 20 minutes above 6,000 feet). Note: To toast nuts, heat in a dry skillet over medium heat until they start to brown. Stir occasionally. Be careful not to scorch them. Note: To test for doneness use the cold saucer test. To do a test, remove pan from heat and place a spoonful of hot jam on a chilled plate. Place in freezer for 1 minute; draw finger through jam on saucer. If jam does not flow back and fill in path, it is thick enough.

Monkey Butter

Monkey Butter

55f5734572378db61d14cbf42f80fc02a medium-size perfectly ripe bananas (no brown spots)
20 oz. can of crushed pineapple, not drained.
1/4 cup coconut (I prefer ground coconut)
3 cups of white sugar
3 T. lemon juice (use bottled for uniform acidity)

Peel and slice bananas, then add all ingredients to a heavy saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring often, and then reduce to a simmer. Cook until thick. As the mixture thickens, stir constantly until desired thickness is achieved. When thick, spoon mixture immediately into hot sterilized jars, apply heated lids and rings, and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes. (or simply store in fridge)

Other fruits can be added, particularly topical fruits such as mango. Also, it is common for the butter to take on a light pink hue when processed. The sample on the right below was not processed, but just stored in the fridge…which I started to do once it became clear that this ambrosia doesn’t hang around long enough to require canning!)

Watermelon Rind Relish

Watermelon Rind Relish

3 quarts water

6 C. shredded watermelon rind

1 C. sugar

1 C. cider vinegar

1 1/2 T. dry mustard

2 tsp.  ground turmeric

1 1/2 tsp.  ground ginger

1/2 tsp.  salt

1/2 tsp.  celery seeds

 

Bring 3 quarts water to a boil in a large saucepan. Add rind; cook 3 minutes. Drain well. Combine sugar and remaining ingredients in pan; bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 2 minutes. Stir in watermelon rind; simmer, uncovered, 30 minutes or until most of liquid is absorbed, stirring frequently. Cool; pour relish into airtight containers. Serve the relish with ham or fish, or stir a little into steamed carrots.

 

 

Yield:

Calories:

Fat:

Fiber:

Spiced Blueberry Jam

Spiced Blueberry Jam

spiced4 C. fresh blueberries, rinsed and drained

3 1/2 C. sugar

1 lemon, juiced

1/4 C. cinnamon red hots

6 oz. bottled liquid pectin

 

In a large saucepan, combine blueberries, sugar, lemon juice and cinnamon red hots.  Bring to a full boil and boil for 1 minute, stirring constantly.  Stir in liquid pectin.  Remove from heat and skim off foam.  Pour hot jam into sterilized jars.  Seal and store in a cool dry place.  Storage life on shelf, one year.

 

Yield:

Calories:

Fat:

Fiber:

 

Sweet Hot Jalapeño Jelly

Sweet Hot Jalapeño Jelly

Serve with fajitas, flautas, tacos, taquitos and carnitas.  Also a terrific dipping sauce for finger food like shrimp and chicken wings.

¾ C. chopped Red Bell Pepper

¾ C. chopped Green Bell Pepper

1/3 C. seeded, diced Jalapeño

2 ¾ C. Sugar

½ C. Red Wine Vinegar

1 T. fresh Lime Juice

6 T. Certo Liquid Pectin

Combine peppers, jalapeno, sugar, vinegar and lime juice in a large saucepan over medium heat.  Heat until warm and sugar is dissolved.  Pour in blender and puree for 5 seconds.  Return blended mixture to saucepan and bring to a boil.  Skim off any foam that rises to the surface.  Decrease heat to low and simmer 5 minutes.  Stir in pectin, increase heat to medium high and bring to a boil.  Remove from heat and cool.  Jelly will set as it cools; transfer to desired storage container when still warm.  Cover and refrigerate up to 5 days.

 

 

From Chevy’s Tex Mex Cookbook

 

 

Yield:

Calories:

Fat:

Fiber:

Zucchini Relish

Zucchini Relish

2 bunch Radishes, coarsely shredded (about 2 C.)

2 medium Zucchini, coarsely shredded (about 3 1/2 C.)

1/2 C. Cider Vinegar

2 T. Olive Oil

1/2 tsp. Salt

4 T. Brown Sugar Twin

 

At least one hour before serving (up to a day ahead), mix all ingredients along with salt to taste.  Cover and refrigerate, stirring occasionally.  Delicious with grilled hamburgers, hot dogs and steak.  Bring on the BBQ!

 

Yield:

Calories:

Fat:

Fiber:

 

Herb Jelly

Herb Jelly

3 sterile 8oz canning jar with lid

1 C. dry white wine

2 C. sugar

1/2 C. vinegar

1 C. fresh basil leaves, or other herbs as a variation

3 oz. bottled liquid pectin

 

Combine wine, sugar, and vinegar in a saucepan, over medium heat.  Heat and stir to dissolve sugar.  Stir in basil and bring to a boil.  Stir in pectin and remove from heat.  Pour into sterile jars.  Screw on lids or top with melted wax.  Serve at room temperature.

Herb_jellies_lr

Basic Herb Jelly recipe

2 cups of your favorite fresh herb leaves or flowers (if using dry herbs, use 1 cup)
2 cups water, apple juice or white wine
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice or white wine vinegar
4 cups sugar (white or brown)
3 ounces liquid fruit pectin
pinch of salt
1-2 drops food color, optional

Wash half-pint jelly jars in the dishwasher, or sterilize in boiling water. Keep jars hot until ready to fill with jelly. Use new Ball or Kerr canning lids, and keep them in hot water.

Method:
Coarsely chop your chosen herbs and put in a medium saucepan. Add 2 cups of water or juice and bring to a constant boil for about 10 seconds. Remove from heat and let stand until completely cooled. Strain, discarding herbs, so that you have 1 1/2 cups of the liquid.

Pour the herbal infusion (liquid) into a large cooking pot and add lemon juice or vinegar and the sugar. Bring to a hard boil, then add the liquid pectin and continue to boil for exactly one minute. Remove from heat and skim off any foam and discard it.

Pour the hot jelly immediately into hot, half-pint jelly jars, filling them to within 1/2 inch of the top. Wipe the rims of the jars with a damp cloth and screw on the hot lids, just lightly tightening. Tip the covered jars upside down for about a minute to coat the inside and create a seal. Place right side up on a towel and let cool. Label and store in a cool, dark place. Your jelly will keep for 1-2 years.

Yield:

Calories:

Fat:

Fiber:

Sweet Olive Jam

Sweet Olive Jam

2 C. drained and pitted Kalamata olives (packed)
1 C. drained and pitted high-quality green olives (packed)
1 1/3 C. sugar
1 1/3 C. water
1 medium lemon
1 large green apple, peeled, cored and diced
1/3 C. mild honey

Put all the olives in a large saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and boil for one minute. Drain completely. Repeat this process two more times – this should take enough salt out of the olives so that they’re only mildly salty. Set the olives aside and rinse out the saucepan. Add the sugar and 1 1/3 C. water to the saucepan and swirl to combine. Cut a couple of strips of zest from the lemon and drop them in the sugar water. Slice the lemon up very thinly (don’t worry about the seeds), and add the slices to the pan as well. Bring this to a simmer over medium heat and let it cook for about 8-10 minutes, or until it’s reduced to about a C. liquid. Pour this through a strainer into a bowl, pressing on the lemon solids to extract as much liquid as possible. Return the liquid to the pan, adding the diced apple, honey and olives. Bring to a simmer once again and cook, stirring occasionally, just until the apples are soft and everything is very thick – about another 10 to 15 minutes (you can add a bit of water if it seems to be getting too thick). Remove from the heat and let cool slightly. With an immersion blender or a normal blender, process the entire mixture until it is velvety-smooth. It should be quite a jammy consistency already; if it’s runny you can continue to cook it a little bit more, but keep in mind it will thicken as it cools. Transfer to jars and refrigerate.

Apricot Pepper Jelly

Apricot Pepper Jelly

 

1 C. red or green bell peppers, cut into strips

2 C. cider vinegar

1/3 C. jalapeño peppers, remove stems & seeds

1 to 1 1/4 C. dried apricot halves, finely slivered

6 C. sugar

3 oz. pouch liquid pectin

5 drops food color, same color as pepper

 

Combine pepper strips, vinegar and jalapeño peppers in an electric blender.  Process stop-and-go fashion until somewhat ground, but small chunks remain.  Combine with apricot strips and sugar in saucepan; bring to a boil.  Boil 5 minutes.  Remove from heat; skim off any foam.  Cool 2 minutes, then mix pectin and food color.  Pour into sterilized jars and fasten lids.  Process in boiling water bath for 15 minutes if desired.  Cool. This gourmet jelly is superb with cream cheese and crackers and is a zippy complement to roasts.

A Collection of Cranberry Sauces

A Collection of Cranberry Sauces

Cranberry Citrus Sauce

 

1 (12-oz.) bag fresh or frozen cranberries

Juice and zest (finely grated peel) of 1 lemon

Juice and zest (finely grated peel) of 1 orange

1 1/4 C. brown sugar

1/2 C. walnuts, coarsely chopped

In a saucepan combine cranberries, lemon, orange, and brown sugar. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer gently for 5-7 minutes. Stir often, but beware of popping cranberries. Remove from heat and add walnuts. Let cool and refrigerate until ready to serve. You can make the sauce ahead of time, as it will keep 3-4 days.

 

 

Cranberry Relish

 

2 small to medium red apples

1 large or 2 small oranges

3 C. firm fresh cranberries

1-1/2 C. sugar

1/8 tsp. Salt

1/2 C. pecans, optional

 

Wash fruit. Quarter apples and cut into chunks. Cut oranges, with rinds intact, into chunks. Remove seeds. With steel blade inserted in processor bowl, chop cranberries in two batches. Transfer to a large mixing bowl. Process apples and oranges, a few chunks at a time, until finely chopped, but not pureed. Empty each batch into bowl with cranberries. Add sugar and salt. Stir to blend. Place in covered container and refrigerate. Keep relish pressed below juices. A lovely red color develops as relish stands a few days. Will keep up to one month. At serving time, sprinkle with chopped pecans if desired.

 

 

Cranberry Relish in Orange Cups

6 Oranges

1 cup Light Brown Sugar, firmly packed

1 cup Orange Juice

1/2 cup Water

2 T. crystallized Ginger, finely chopped

1/2 tsp. ground Ginger

Dash of ground Cloves

4 cups Cranberries

 

Cut the oranges in half and remove pulp. Cover and store orange shells in the refrigerator; they will keep well for 2 days. To loosen the pulp from the shell, cut around the inside of each orange half with the knife. Using a small spoon, carefully remove the pulp and discard (or reserve as recommended), leaving the orange shell intact. In a large saucepan, stir together the brown sugar, orange juice, water, crystallized ginger, ground ginger, and cloves. Bring the mixture to a boil over high heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Reduce the heat to medium-high and cook, uncovered, for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add the cranberries and return the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat again to medium-high, and boil for 3 to 5 minutes or until skins pop, stirring occasionally. Transfer the relish to a covered container and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving. You may store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Spoon the cranberry relish into the orange shells to serve.

 

 

Whole-Berry Cranberry Sauce

 

1 lb. Fresh Cranberries

1 C. Water

1 C. Sugar

 

Combine all ingredients in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil, cover, then turn to medium heat. Continue cooking until all the berries pop. Remove from heat and let cool. Refrigerate until cold, or serve warm.

 

 

Yield:

Calories:

Fat:

Fiber:

 

Prickly Pear Preserves (Yucatán)

Prickly Pear Preserves (Yucatán)

Prickly Pear Preserves (Yucatán)

In order to preserve the beautiful dark-purple color of the prickly pears, be sure to cook the preserves over medium heat so they simmer, not boil. Keep an eye on them toward the end of cooking; overcooking can also turn them brown.

 

2 prickly pears

One 1/2-inch piece ginger, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch slices

1 tablespoon white vinegar

1 tablespoon water

1 tablespoon sugar

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

 

Remove the skin from the prickly pears. Put the flesh in a bowl and break it apart with a spoon until liquefied. Combine the prickly pear, ginger, vinegar, water, sugar, and salt in a medium-size saucepan, bring to a simmer over medium heat and simmer until the liquid is reduced by half and syrupy, 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool, then strain out the seeds and ginger.

Shallot Jam

Shallot Jam

1 T. olive oil

5 medium shallots, peeled and sliced thin

1/2 C. chicken broth

1/4 C. balsamic vinegar

2 heaping T. apricot jam or preserves

salt and pepper

 

Heat 1 T. of olive oil in a medium to large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the shallots, season with salt and pepper, and cook for about 5 minutes, until they begin to get soft and the bottom of the pan begins to brown. Add the 1/2 C. chicken broth to the shallots, scraping the brown bits off the bottom of the pan while the broth reduces. Add the balsamic vinegar, reduce the heat to medium-low, and cook for about 5 more minutes. Add the apricot jam and stir to combine. The sauce will thicken but should still be easily stirred.

Sweet and Spicy Canned Onion Marmalade

Sweet and Spicy Canned Onion Marmalade

Sweet and Spicy Canned Onion Marmalade

2 pounds onions preferably sweet or a mix of sweet and regular

1 C. apple juice

1/2 C. cider vinegar

2 teaspoons fresh minced garlic

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 teaspoon ground mustard

1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

3 T. Low or No Sugar Needed pectin – flex batch equals 1 box

1/2 teaspoon butter or oil optional to reduce foaming, but I always use it

1 C. honey

1/2 C. brown sugar

 

Prepare water bath canner, 6 half pint jars & lids, keeping warm until needed. Cut ends off onions and peel; slice in half and cut each in half again, lengthwise (or in thirds if onions are big). Turn halves and cut into 1/4 inch slices widthwise. Place slices in an 8-quart measuring C. – you should have 6 C. of onion slices. Add prepared onions, apple juice, vinegar, garlic, salt, pepper, mustard and red pepper flakes to an 8-quart stockpot. Gradually stir in pectin and then add butter if using. Bring to a boil that can’t be stirred down over high heat, stirring constantly. Add honey and sugar; return to a full boil and let boil for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat (skim foam if needed). Ladle hot marmalade into prepared half pint jars one at a time, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe rims, attach lids, and place in canner. Place lid on canner and bring to a gentle, steady boil – process for 10 minutes, maintaining steady boil the entire time. Turn off heat and let jars cool in canner 5 minutes before removing jars to a towel lined surface to cool for 24 hours. Check lids for seal before labeling and storing in a cool, dark place (with rings removed). Notes: *You don’t have to can this – it will keep for 2-3 months in the refrigerator.

 

  • Use as a glaze for meats like chicken, ham and pork, as well as seafood (my favorite is shrimp).
  • Top grilled steak, pork, chicken and seafood.
  • Add on top of Boursin cheese or cream cheese as an appetizer.
  • Mix into sour cream as a dip for crackers, pretzels, or chips.